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When did you replace brake pads? If at all.

Discussion in 'Servicing & Maintenance' started by SauRoN, Sep 11, 2017.

  1. Leon.P.

    Leon.P. Well-Known Member

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    I am not hard on brakes but happy to used them when needed. At 22000 Klms I had my rear Rotors and Pads replaced under warranty as they were warped . Hope that's not a pattern.:(o_O
     
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  2. SauRoN

    SauRoN Well-Known Member

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    I was actually thinking on my way home last night that maybe the Quickshifter is helping the decreased pad wear even further along because I certainly engine brake more with this bike and stay off the brakes completely in many cases over previous ones.

    Previous bikes I would generally only engine brake after already applying the brakes and in the motion of slowing down. Because of the Shift Assist though I often find myself just banging down the box and braking at the very end instead.
     
  3. Number9Cloud

    Number9Cloud New Member

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    I do almost all my riding in heavy traffic with lots of braking. With my previous Hondas, I was going through rear pads every 4,000 miles and the front ones every 8,000 miles. I hope the RS pads are no worse :rolleyes:
     
  4. boxter

    boxter Active Member

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    Hard pads = high disc wear, few pads usually short life discs.

    Soft pads = low disc wear, more pads but long life discs.


    It's a trade off,. ( Usually )


    Ged
     
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  5. darrell

    darrell Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Today I installed my 7th set of tires on the RS at 45,300 miles and the brake pads were all fine. Both mechanic and I felt they will last through 2 more tire changes.
     
  6. petey

    petey Member

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    Impressive milage Darrell, I'm less than 2K miles behind you, I however used a couple more rears than you. Lets see who gets to 50K first....I love this bike.
     
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  7. darrell

    darrell Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Thanks for the note. It is an enjoyable bike to ride. I can let you know when I reach 50K but I'm not a person who just rides to accumulate miles. I try to enjoy the journey by stopping to see things and educate myself along the way. Also the 3 BMW GS bikes in the garage like to get out when I'm home from a trip and rotate their wheels a bit. We are probably about 6 weeks away from salt being tossed on the roads and then they all go in to hibernation for 5 months or a bit longer. And then I get to start planning for some rides in 2018.
     
  8. lj516

    lj516 Active Member

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    Replaced my pads (front and rear) at 4k miles with ebc HH pads. I much prefer the feeling of more aggressive pads and intend on replacing the disks with "wavy" variants eventually as well.
    I too have a hard time not engine braking but the thought of wearing the rear tire out faster and that pads are cheaper than piston rings keep me at bay. Not that engine braking does damage but one can't deny the fact that the engine, trans, rear wheel are doing work that's not necessary and over 100k miles...
     
  9. Peter Burridge

    Peter Burridge Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Warping can actually be quite a pretty pattern....

    I'll get my coat.
     
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  10. oscarguitar

    oscarguitar Well-Known Member

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    So do you de-clutch when braking? Otherwise the pistons are doing just as much work. And unless you are getting the rear wheel off the ground when you are braking, it's going round just as many times. Never heard that approach to braking on the road before, what source did it come from? No wonder you need more aggressive pads and wavy discs.
    Hope I don't ever end up following you. But that's unlikely since I doubt I could keep up and we are on different continents. Phew!
     
  11. Peter Burridge

    Peter Burridge Well-Known Member Contributor

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    There is a myth that was spread in IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists -UK) circles a few years ago that goes something like 'engine for go, brakes for slow' and 'it's cheaper to replace brake pads than an engine/gearbox'. This misinformation has persisted in some groups.

    The original intention was that riders don't use the gearbox to the extent that the rear wheel is locking or skipping. The use of good 'acceleration sense' i. e. regulating speed by use of the throttle and an appropriate gear is to be encouraged as it promotes smooth, skilful riding that places less stress on the tyres and the machine.

    A few years ago one or two influential characters high up in the organisation were advising coming into every corner fast and always using braking to slow, like when racing, (to gain an advantage) :eek: Thankfully this idea died a death, mostly.

    Being concerned about engine wear is a bit of a nonsense imo even in the long term. The pumping loads seen during engine braking are much less than those seen when under load and the rings are better lubricated due to oil being drawn up. You could even suggest that engine braking gives the rings a well earned break ;)As said above, unless you declutch you'll subject the engine to them any way..

    Peter
     
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  12. oscarguitar

    oscarguitar Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Peter, that clears up where that tosh came from.
    I'll stick with the appropriate use of engine braking for a smooth and skilful ride. ;)
     
  13. lj516

    lj516 Active Member

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    De-clutch? In as have the clutch pulled in the entire time during braking to a stop? Yes.
    Now, when it comes to cornering I do keep the engine/clutch engaged throughout but that's not to say I rely on the engine for slowing.
    As for wear. Engine braking will wear out the rear faster same as using the rear break. Why? Because it's the rear tire providing the traction to do the work. It has little to do with revolutions and all to do with work(in physics terms).
    Again, I have no source to say that engine braking over x amount of time will wear your engine so much more but all you have to do is understand that work must be done and for the most part work=wear.
    I avoid it where I can but won't sacrifice a smooth ride to eliminate it completely. It should also be noted that we have this WONDERFUL thing called ABS and I'll give you one guess as to which system that runs on
    These type of questions come up in my motorcycle classes often along with the "uncle Joe Bob says never to use the front brake..." and overall we always encourage being well acquainted with your brakes and establishing proper braking habits especially in the case of emergency braking. I dearly hope none of you plan on engine braking for one of those.
     
  14. Peter Burridge

    Peter Burridge Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Eek :eek:


    I find that frankly patronising...


    See comment 2 above.

    I'm left wondering what your level of experience and expertise is. To say that you avoid using acceleration sense to reduce speed as much as possible and that you go to classes where you even discuss such things as 'Uncle Joe Bob' and his ways makes me think you are new to this stuff. Reduce speed by the use of brakes and throttle with the correct gear selection as appropriate to the circumstances. I also wouldn't want to follow you far :)

    Peter
     
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  15. Bravo

    Bravo Plenty in the tank. Contributor

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    .
    Several years ago I was taken on a driving improvement course for large goods vehicles. One thing I remember from it was.Use the brakes not the gears to slow down because it's cheaper to replace brake pads than replace a gear box.
    Fast forward 18 years I now have truck that praises me for slowing down using the retarder (not the retard behind the wheel)instead of the brakes. Guess what? The retarder works in conjunction with the auto powershift box to bring the speed down by dropping the gears until the whole 44000kgs stops.
    I use engine braking all the while on the bike,so much fun with the auto blipper:)
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2017
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  16. darrell

    darrell Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Promised I’d let you know when I reached 50,000 miles. Was today. 4AFAB240-4511-49DE-A011-F45A7045A840.jpeg 07D70032-76F6-473D-9D41-68139D5F48D0.jpeg
     
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  17. SauRoN

    SauRoN Well-Known Member

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    Man that's impressive.

    If you have the time would you mind listing what's been replaced on the bike in that period and how much it has cost you (more or less) to own?

    Would make for an interesting thread.

    How far do you still see yourself going with it?
     
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  18. Peter Burridge

    Peter Burridge Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I’d like to see that too together with any issues you’ve had with the bike.
     
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  19. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    Happy 50,oooth anniversary Darrel.

    As per other comments above - how has the bike stood up to 50k? Costs/condition of paint/finish etc.

    I bought mine as a long term bike (10yrs?) so would be good know how they fare with high mileage.
     
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  20. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    That's good to know, Darrel. Man, your bike is racking up the miles .... surely has to be the highest mileage RS on the forum! :)
     
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