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Whatever happened to quick-release wheels?

Discussion in 'General R1200RS Discussions' started by Jim Evans, Feb 2, 2018.

  1. Jim Evans

    Jim Evans Well-Known Member

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    I just removed the front wheel for the first time (I never had a front stand before). I'm amazed at how complicated it was. I remember when you could undo a nut, undo the torque arm and pop the cable off, pull out the axle and you were done. You could do it on the centrestand, too. Ah, progress...
     
  2. Boxerboy55

    Boxerboy55 Well-Known Member

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    You might not want to do it in a hurry on dark, wet night, but I wouldn’t call it “complicated”.

    It’s just not Quick Release.

    With the 4 (I think) tools, a couple of bits of string and some common sense, the wheel just pops out :)
     
  3. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Quick release wheels went out with fully-enclosed chain guards sometime during the 1960's. :rolleyes:
     
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  4. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    No, quick release wheels have been shelved by the industry. The first tepli-racer superbikes had them. Neat 2 bolt swinging saddles released the front axle.
    Maybe the clearance of the brakes / tyres made it impractical.maybe cost. May be the hand wringing social engineering. It could also be the average bike had its front wheel removed only 1 or 2 times a year or less.
     
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  5. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    I've got QR wheels on my 1980 MZ....and a fully enclosed chainguard.......and proper mudguards.....and the chain stays fixed when you remove the rear wheel - no need for re-adjustment.

    Progress?

    image.jpeg
     
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  6. boxter

    boxter Well-Known Member

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    Ahhh, oh no, someone is posting obscene pictures......

    :)

    Ged
     
  7. Nielsen 33

    Nielsen 33 New Member

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    That must be a late model, mine had fixed headlight, so a slight challenge when turning on a small dark road ;-)
     
  8. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    Not the prettiest bike in the world but it would be my first choice for a RTW ride - small enough to manage, bomb proof mechanicals and repairable with a hammer and a pair of pliers. London to Vladivostok - I'd take the Zed over the RS any day!

    Looking at taking it to Spa or Chimay later this year for the classics - load it up with tent a pair of throw over Swagmans and away you go.
     
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  9. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    Yep - it's a ts250 super 5 - tele forks instead of earls type, 5sp instead of 4, better porting and cooling.

    I'll be giving it a 12v electronic ignition upgrade this year.
     
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  10. Brimstone Mahone

    Brimstone Mahone Well-Known Member

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    Bicycles have quick release wheels; never seen them on a motorcycle! ;)
     

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  11. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    They don't make them like that anymore I assume, especially now that Euro 4 has arrived. The U.S. got the MuZ bikes, but I think the sale of actual East German MZ lumps pretty much dissipated by the 1970's. And once the U.S. EPA started to plug up two strokes during the early-1980's, all of the smokey fun dissipated too. I managed to get one of the last two strokes sold in America in 2004. Nothing quick detach on that bike though. Except maybe the engine. :rolleyes:
     

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  12. Nielsen 33

    Nielsen 33 New Member

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    Mine looked more like this one, reliable and brilliant for winter driving when I lived in Denmark :)
     

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  13. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

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    The single sided swing-arm gave us the quick release rear wheel. Good brakes killed that concept elsewhere....
     
  14. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    Hi BM

    They're not QR in the way that the skewers on bicycles are..........they still involve using as wrench and a bar on the spindle....
     
  15. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    Cracking bike Richard........if I had the money and space, I'd fill my garage with stink wheels....H1/2, RD's, GT750,GT500.......the list goes on.........I love the smell of two stroke in the morning.
     
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  16. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    Plenty of patina on that Nielson!
     
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  17. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    That is what happens when you soup up a two-stroke and double its horsepower then take the thing on the freeway for a 50-mile, 80 mph, ride. ;) Kerboom! :eek:
     
  18. James Bagley

    James Bagley Well-Known Member

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    I wonder what might be done with water-cooling and direct injection on an up-to-date stroker? I would think loads of power and no seizing...

    Nice MZ, Gordon.
     
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  19. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    Hi James
    I think KTM have just launched a 250cc direct injection 2 stroke trail bike......very light, loads of torque.....and as clean as a 4 stroke.....

    MZ is one of those bikes that's taken me 30 years to appreciate the level of engineering simplification that went in to them. Back in the day, I used to scoff at them as a POS when compared to the sophistication of the Japaness stuff then! Oh the wisdom of age!

    I bought it as a box of bits about 3 years ago (it had been in that condition for at least 20yrs) and I was amazed at how little work was required to get the components looking good....the only real expense was powder coating the frame, tank, panels and mudguards). Picture below was the "bits" in the vendors garage.

    image.jpeg
     
  20. Jim Evans

    Jim Evans Well-Known Member

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    I had a MZ 250 back in 1973: enclosed chain, 5 gallon tank, decent performance. But it was sadly let down by some of the components, in particular tires that would suddenly dump you on your arse for no apparent reason and a chain that, in spite of the enclosure and proper lubrication, shed all its rollers into said enclosure within a very few thousand miles. However, it did start every time and never quit on me..
     

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