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What have you done to your bike today

Discussion in 'General R1200RS Discussions' started by Peter Burridge, Jan 28, 2016.

  1. duccrazydave

    duccrazydave Active Member

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    Love the shims! Great insurance in case you accidentally grab that brake lever
     
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  2. PeTe T

    PeTe T Active Member

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    I like the prayer rug. For worshipping the bike of course.
     
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  3. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    No.
     
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  4. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    I don't like them hanging loose by the hose. It's also a good place to keep the bolts.
     
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  5. Olgry1

    Olgry1 Member

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    At least every other tire change I do take the time to clean the caliper pistons with a tooth brush and Q-tips. I started to do so after reading articles on brake maintenance in Sport Rider, Motorcyclist and or other magazines back in the day.
     
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  6. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I seriously contemplated doing this when I was removing the front wheel to get the tire changed, and think its a great idea since the calipers are off anyway. To my mind, brakes are the most important equipment on a bike need to not be neglected.
     
  7. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    Are you removing the pistons or cleaning what's exposed?
     
  8. Milo

    Milo Member

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    Every other tire change (so around 12,000 miles) I drain the FD since the wheel is off and out of the way so it's easy to put the pan under. I also change brake fluid then because the calipers are off so it's easy to pry the pads wide apart which pushes more of the old fluid out of the calipers. So every other time (when I change fluid) I bolt the calipers back on like Lee. :D. The other times they just hang by bungies.
     
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  9. Ilan Balaban

    Ilan Balaban Member

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    well it was a month of new stuff for the bike.

    New tires - Pirelli Angel GT
    30K service - new oil and filter
    New brake pads in the front

    Ready to roll before it would be to hot to ride long trips
     
  10. oscarguitar

    oscarguitar Well-Known Member

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    New tyres. Michelin Road 5s. Only done about 10 miles, but they are much nicer than he squared off PR4s that came off! (5th set of PR4s)
    First impressions, rear seems a bigger diameter and raises the back of the bike. Much easier to put on centre stand, rear tyre is only just off the floor. Wierd looking skinny front tyre! I think the steering is slower than new PR4s which is odd as the back is raised which should make it quicker. The rear tyre seems to have a less prounounced radius and looks f’ing huge.
    I will put about 500 miles on next week so will report back later Jury still out.
     
  11. Bravo

    Bravo Plenty in the tank Contributor

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    Get them all nice and scuffed and you'll love em(just my opinion,I appreciate all tyres don't work for everyone :))
     
  12. oscarguitar

    oscarguitar Well-Known Member

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    I’m sure you are right. I had become so used to the knife edge initial turn in and then immediate ‘hold up’ to stop the ‘flop’, that a new set of tyres with a progressive turn in will feel strange for a bit.
     
  13. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    I know that feeling well, but sometimes it is the geometry of the bike even with good tyres.
    From what I see on my daily commute, the small bike and scooter riders don't seem to have poor handling on very worn out tyres. Either that or they just don't know.
     
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  14. Bravo

    Bravo Plenty in the tank Contributor

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    @Alistair
    Hope your mudsling is working well,Here's a few snaps of mine after last weekend's ride In torrential rain on dirty roads,as you can see the shock stayed pretty clean,dread to think what state it would have been if not for the MS. The hugger while looking pretty did pretty much nothing protection wise..... bout as much use as tits on a kipper.
    If anyone would like info on how I found an old post on the mudsling ..... I used the search function. Just saying.
     

    Attached Files:

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  15. Olgry1

    Olgry1 Member

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    Sorry for slow response I was on a trip to Texas.
    Cleaning what is exposed with the pads removed. I would suggest working on one caliper at a time and working on only two opposing pistons (4 piston calipers) at a time. The other 2 pistons should be secured from being "pumped out" with a block of wood or other item suitable item. With the calipers removed from the fork and hung/supported by a bungie cord you slowly pump the brake lever while watching the pistons extend from their bore. Often one of the two pistons will not want to extend from their bore. If that is the case I just grip the caliper and hold the free piston from extending and eventually the stuck piston will extend. You only need to have the pistons extend far enough to expose the ring of dirt/dust around the piston. You DO NOT want them to extend too far as they may pop out of the bore and that is a big headache! :mad: That ring of dirt on the pistons is what you want to clean. Personally I use simple green, a tooth brush and q-tips to clean away the ring of dirt and a used beverage bottle to rise everything off. While I am at I also clean the calipers, brake pads and brake hardware and then apply minimal lube where applicable and finally assemble.
    There are also a number of good articles and how to videos specific to motorcycle brake caliper piston cleaning on line with more details than I have provided.
     
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  16. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Nice write up, John. I need to do some cleaning of my brakes as well and when I do get around to it I will video what I do. I have done similar to your process in the past but not often. This is a job that can be easily done without taking too much stuff apart. With all the reliance we place on brakes we should give more attention to their maintenance but I don't do that enough. Yesterday I had the need to apply the brakes seriously and thank goodness the linked Brembos were more than up to the task. First time I had the front ABS kick in briefly but the bike was as stable and safe as you please. Brilliant.
     
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  17. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    The traction control is great too. Kept me safe last week and made my little drift on a wet corner look skillful.
     
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  18. lupo

    lupo Active Member

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    Hi folks,
    Have now the Continental Road Attack 3 GT. Went perfect from the first km. Like it.
    And the Hill Start Control for 190€. Like it too, perfect with Sozia and luggage.
    Thats all for now;)
     
  19. Olgry1

    Olgry1 Member

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    Thanks Wayne. Glad your experience yesterday turned ok! Great brakes are one of my favorite things on a motorcycle.
     
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  20. Jeroen1969

    Jeroen1969 Well-Known Member

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    It already had it’s own separate thread....(on my iPhone now, difficult for me to paste in a short cut to that thread).

    Cut a long story short: I had my Lupin, one of the very first RS’s to leave the plant in Berlin in May 2015, upgraded to ABS Pro in November 2016. It required a ride to BMW in Bonn, Germany, as the Dutch dealer at that time could do the upgrade, but at double the cost. Took me €32,- in gasoline and a day in the saddle that I actually enjoyed... upgrade itself was around €200. But that was an action price at the time. Currently in Europe, you’re looking at around €450,- for the upgrade.

    Your bike is fit for the ABS upgrade when it has the bank angle sensor, a white little box that comes into view when you take the seat off. As I understood it at the time: all RS’s with Ride Mode Pro have the bank angle sensor.
     
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