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What a difference

Discussion in 'R1200RS Tech and Performance Chat' started by Andy Griffiths, Oct 31, 2016.

  1. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    Now, last night I finally got to tinkering with the height of the gear change lever - mainly due to noticing that my Daytona Strive boots ( highly recommended) were thicker than my others on the sole.
    Anyways spent some time fiddling and adjusting and then stole the afternoon to go riding, and ...what a difference. Gear change was slicker and so was quick-shifting. This can only be because my foot was nicely placed right under the lever as opposed to a bit lower.
    Not going to go all tech analysis on this but recommend it to those that have not fine tuned their gear lever height yet ( can't be just me right?)
     
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  2. DABs

    DABs Active Member

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    From memory I adjusted mine almost as far up as it would go. Daytona Travel Star GT.

    Only use clutch to/from 1st unless old muscle memory wins out.

    Dave
     
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  3. Leon.P.

    Leon.P. Well-Known Member

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    Hi Andy. I went out and purchased a pair of Daytona Boots. Hopped on the bike and found that it was struggle to shift up the gears. My first thoughts were that maybe I made a huge mistake with these boots. Went straight home and moved the gear lever as high as it would go. Problem solved.:):)
     
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  4. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    Leon, that was exactly my experience ! So much so that the boots at in the cupboard over the summer. So pleased I did not Ebay them, as that thought more than crossed my mind.
     
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  5. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Andy - good tip on adjusting the gear lever. Thanks for sharing.

    Boots aside, we are all different physiologically, so it would make sense that the factory setting might not be ideal for all riders at the outset, but not many (me included) make the effort to actually change that, preferring instead to adapt to the machine.
     
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  6. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    GG,
    Me too, until Sunday. The adjustment is actually very clever and extensive relying on a lockbar system. Literally, 30 seconds. This is far superior to the older splined shaft where the adjustment was in defined increments. Yet, there handbook does not ever mention this adjustment or explain it - go figure!
     
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  7. Duckbubbles

    Duckbubbles Active Member

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    I've adjusted shift, rear brake, clutch and front brake levers to be in more comfortable positions for me.

    Frank
     
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  8. OKBMW

    OKBMW Active Member Contributor

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    For years I used to just ride my bikes the way they came setup. But finally figured out it is worth playing with all possible adjustments for best performance and comfort i.e. shifter position, handle bar position, clutch and brake lever positon, SAG, rebound and compression adjustments when available. Makes all the difference in the world.
     
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  9. boxerboy

    boxerboy Well-Known Member

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    OK - now I have a small project to tinker with in the garage these cold evenings - thanks!
     
  10. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    better get a book or boxed set as this project will take about 5 minutes. Add another 5 if you do the brake pedal as well.
     
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  11. Phillo

    Phillo Active Member

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    Mmm....maybe I must devote some time to lookin into this..I have also just ridden my bikes as they came....
     
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  12. OKBMW

    OKBMW Active Member Contributor

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    You may have to play with different settings and you may even ended up back to the original setting but it's worth exploring. I more often than not end up with my hand controls and the shifter in a different position that fits me better.
     
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  13. folagana

    folagana Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Otherwise the life is boring!
     
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  14. Peter Burridge

    Peter Burridge Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I had to adjust my HP levers as I lowered the footrests to the mid position. It's not much of a distance but riding with them in the original position was way out.

    I've not had a problem grounding them out and never have on any bike. Interesting reading recently that footrest clearance for speed around a bend isn't a given but depends on a couple of factors that are both within a rider's control.
     
  15. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    Please tell me more ...
     
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  16. Bunter

    Bunter Active Member

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    Is it obvious how to do it Andy?
    Bill
     
  17. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    very easy - there is an obvious adjuster, just release a lock nut and twiddle it until the pedal moves up or down as required. Same on the other side for the brake pedal - although you have to lift the rubber boot to see the flats to twiddle to adjust.
     
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  18. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    as per Wessie,
    Gear lever
    8mm spanner to hold nut in centre of adjustment bar.
    10mm spanner to release lock nuts at either end of bar - wind them two or three turns so they are clear ( note they move in opposite directions)
    Use hand to turn bar adjacent to 8mm nut either clock or anti clockwise - you will see gear lever going either up or down.
    Retighten 10mmm lock nuts, then 8 mmm nut. Test by sitting on bike - adjust further as necessary.
    5 minute job at most
     
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  19. Peter Burridge

    Peter Burridge Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I suppose I was fishing for a bite and for that I should apologise. Credit must go to Keith Code and his Twist of the Wrist II.

    First, if you take a third of the bend getting the bike into it's lean angle, something not unusual IMO, then the lean angle you need for the remainder of the bend is greater than if you counter steer consciously and positively to get the bike to its lean angle sooner. You are less likely to deck the rests or run wide on corner exit.

    The 2nd point is that accelerating raises the front and the rear, so getting on the gas early and progressively raises the whole bike.

    Conversely not opening the throttle (let alone actually closing it) in the bend transfers weight to the front and lowers the rear as the bike slows due to reduced tyre radius.
     
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  20. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    OK - so let's be clear about this twiddling thing - just in case something was lost in translation between the Cotswolds and here. Is there a special twiddle tool I need to get from England to get this done correctly?

    (Actually, I was taught to always keep the heels down, and I made the shift adjustment pretty much on delivery. Nonetheless, I enjoyed every comment above - somehow a few minutes twiddling in my garage evoked none of the philosophy or observations on life this adjustment was capable of providing.)

    And Peter's correct - on the throttle as soon as possible - even if you find yourself with a little trail braking on that newly adjusted pedal....
     
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