No customization options are available.

Tyre Pressures

Discussion in 'R1200RS Tyres/Tires' started by Spiky, Aug 30, 2015.

  1. Spiky

    Spiky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    473
    Trophy Points:
    63
    What are people running?

    I've got PR4s which the dealer set at 38/43psi, but I'm starting to suspect that this may be harder than is necessary (I recall that when I took delivery of my GS I was told to run 40/44, but subsequently settled on 34/38 as being ideal for my weight). I've just returned from a couple of days of pretty fast riding and had the bike airborne over bumps more than once.

    If anybody has taken the time to play about with pressures to see the difference, it will save me a bit of buggering around. I'm about 74kg soaking wet, for the record.
     
  2. JHero

    JHero Active Member

    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    161
    Trophy Points:
    43
    The normal tyre pressures for the PR4's is 36/42
     
  3. Spiky

    Spiky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    473
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Is that what you run?

    Seems odd for the dealer to have deliberately overinflated them.
     
  4. Psy69

    Psy69 Active Member

    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    143
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Book pressures are indeed 36/42. Though they only quote the one figure with nothing else in there for solo / pillion riding. I guess 36/42 is all encompassing but to me is a little hard for solo so room for some adjustment down for personal tastes.
     
    Richard230 likes this.
  5. JHero

    JHero Active Member

    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    161
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Yes that is what I run. Seems ok to me. The tyre pressure monitor shows the tyre pressure going up, 38/44, when the tyres get hot.
    The owners manual recommends when cold
    Front 2.5 bar (36.2595 psi)
    Rear 2.9 bar (42.06102 psi)
     
  6. Spiky

    Spiky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    473
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Thanks. I suppose BMW recommend a 'one size fits all' option - it's easier for everybody that way.

    I'll try gradually knocking a few psi out as I did with the GS and see if I can find a better set up.
     
  7. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    433
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Agree with the 36/42 which the tyre pressure monitor shows as 2.5/2.9 as per owners manual.
    Also confused why only one setting solo/solo plus luggage or two up with luggage on PR4's..
    My R1200ST fitted with same make tyres (PR/PR2 and now PR3) and same sizes but advised as 32/36 solo and 36/42 for 2 up and loaded.
    I thought the tyre footprint would be altered by different pressures so have to set lower when carrying less weight so that's why the ST has variable settings.
    It is the same 36/42 2.5/2.9 for my 2013 R1200R which also had ESA for all rider/load situations
    Then the RS also only has one setting, is this due again to ESA electronic suspension? I cannot see any different settings for a non ESA model apart from spring preload for rear but not a tyres pressure change.
    Anyone tried 32/36 for solo use on the RS?
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2015
  8. oscarguitar

    oscarguitar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,035
    Likes Received:
    880
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I had 2 sets of the the RP4s on my previous bike. Did 11,000 miles on them. (2000 on the second set before I sold it). I played around with all sorts of combinations, but in the end, 36/42 suited me best. I had long correspondence with Mitchelin about this. They suggested -3 psi (from recommended pressure) as as low as you should go, I tried as low as -6psi, but it all got a bit squirmy. In the end I went back to the manufacturers recommendation and never looked back. Same for pillion as solo. With the RS I have tried going lower, but ended back at the recommended 36/42.
     
  9. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

    Messages:
    2,689
    Likes Received:
    1,973
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I have been running 36/42 psi, with the display indicating 35/42 psi, even after riding 30 miles at 80 mph. The pressure never seems to change, which leads me to believe that 36/42 is probably too high for a light solo rider without any luggage. I think the recommendation is to accommodate the maximum permitted load, just to be safe should you happen to pick up a 300 pound passenger while out on a ride. o_O Still, I doubt that running this pressure will have any adverse affects, other than making for a hard ride and perhaps reducing traction during cold, wet, winter riding. :confused:
     
    Goss1 likes this.
  10. Spiky

    Spiky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    473
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Thanks guys, that's some good feedback. I'll try knocking a few psi out and see how it goes.

    Exactly! This is why I started this thread, actually. I stayed at a pub in middle-of-nowhere, NSW at the weekend and woke up to -2 and freezing fog. The first hour or so of riding was entertaining, to say the least. It felt as if the tyres were made of wood, even when they (and I) had warmed up.
     
  11. fireguy286

    fireguy286 Member

    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I have the RP4s too, and I try to stay at the recommended 36/42... but I never seem to be able to hold it. No matter what it always seems to settle at around 35/40. Never goes lower though. Rides fine, I don't lose sleep over it. I assume the Dynamic ESA is the reason there's only one recommendation for it.
     
  12. Ben Russo

    Ben Russo Active Member

    Messages:
    363
    Likes Received:
    202
    Trophy Points:
    43
    The 36/42 is good for making tires last longer.
    If I am shredding twisties, I go for 30/35, it eats up the tires faster, but keeps them hotter and offers better grip.

    -Ben.
     
  13. Rocky R

    Rocky R Active Member

    Messages:
    249
    Likes Received:
    220
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I'm with Ben, I too, run a little lower for having fun in the twisties. I run 34/38 and grips well. I ran it for a while at the factory setting and the tires felt a little hard and vague. I'm sure the higher setting will give improved mpg if that is the goal...
     
  14. Spiky

    Spiky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    473
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Coincidentally, I've set mine at about the same (35/39) and much prefer it. It certainly stops the wooden crashing-into-bumps feeling that I got with the higher pressures, and as a result offers more feeling through the steering. I'm yet to give it a real high speed run, but early indications are good.
     
  15. RSRider

    RSRider Member

    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    63
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Yesterday, I finished a 99-mile test riding solo on my RS with 33 & 35 PSI cold with soft Pirelli Diablo Rosso's newly mounted. Those pressures are obviously not ideal for tire life o_O but they produced phenomenal edge-grip, road feedback and comfort on the mountain curves where I ride. :) Cheers!
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2015
  16. Spiky

    Spiky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    473
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Nice! Who cares about tyre life anyway?
     
    Ben Russo and RSRider like this.
  17. RSRider

    RSRider Member

    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    63
    Trophy Points:
    18
    When on two wheels, 'grip' is the first priority for me. :cool:
     
    RJC_BMW, Steve L and Spiky like this.
  18. jamesgarnor

    jamesgarnor Active Member

    Messages:
    280
    Likes Received:
    124
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Tyre specs by BMW and tyre makers say 36/42 but that's a pressure for all, they do say that if you're on a track day drop the pressures down a 'few psi'
    What ever a few is? I suppose a real hard blast counts too?
     
  19. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

    Messages:
    2,689
    Likes Received:
    1,973
    Trophy Points:
    113
    My understanding is that recommended tire pressures are set for the maximum tire load for the recommended tires that is likely to be seen on the specific motorcycle ridden at its highest speed and highest load as specified by the manufacturer.

    I have been keeping track of recommended tire pressures for years. You can go back to BMW's recommendations for the air-heads and find typical recommendations (for tube-type tires) of 28 psi front and 30 psi rear. Obviously those bikes were lighter and slower than the current models, but I think they carried about the same maximum weight and I can't recall hearing stories of exploding tires during those days.

    Prior to about 5 years ago tire manufacturers used to provide recommended pressures for their tires on each specific motorcycle model for both solo riding and two-up riding with luggage. I believe BMW also provided such tire pressures in their older manuals. However, both the tire companies and BMW now seem to recommend only the maximum tire pressures that would be used for the bike carrying its weight limit and riding at its top speed. This seems to typically be 36 psi front and 42 psi rear for most large sport and sport-touring models of all brands. The only logical reason for providing these higher pressures is that the motorcycle and tire manufacturers do not trust the vehicle owner to adjust their tire pressures for the specific load they are carrying and speed they will be riding at each day and thereby assume that the owners are dimwits (might be true in some cases) and will never think about adjusting the pressures before riding off. So they recommend the highest pressures just to be safe for all concerned.

    Also, I was once told by a dealer that BMW started recommending higher tire pressures when they had a rash of warranty claims due to their soft rims being damaged when hitting a large pothole. The higher pressures were supposed to reduce the chance of the rim being damaged and I believe it did help that problem. Of course it didn't take BMW too long before they changed the alloy of their cast wheels to make the rims stronger. While the wheels can still be damaged when taking a very hard hit, it happens much less frequently than it did during 10 or 15 years ago.
     
    ady and runnerhiker like this.
  20. KOCook

    KOCook Active Member

    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    168
    Trophy Points:
    43
    For Michelin PR4 or Power SuperSport Evo use the 36/42 for normal & sporty street riding. If you are hitting the traction control a lot when exiting turns, you drop the rear pressures a few psi. For track you can go with 36/36. Michelin's Race Rep said there is no benefit to running below 36 psi in the front, but the sidewalls will flex too much under heavy braking.

    And remember that tire settings are based on 68 degrees Fahrenheit on cold tires--adjust plus/minus 1 psi for every 10 degrees over/under 68F.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [edit]PS, if you are looking for a solid tire gauge, get a Moto-D digital. It is spot on.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2015
    stageraider, Richard230 and Ben Russo like this.

Share This Page