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Those Wonderful Country Diners

Discussion in 'USA Northeast Riders' started by darrell, Jul 28, 2016.

  1. darrell

    darrell Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I'm so jealous of you rider's in the NE US who have all those local country diners to ride to for breakfast or lunch. We have a few in the upper Midwest but most are located in the larger cities and are replicates not original structures like many of yours are.

    I was riding in NY, VT and PA for a week after the BMW MOA Nat'l Rally. Early one morning coming out of VT, crossing the corner of MA, then entering NY, I was ready to stop for breakfast and ran across this cool diner outside Chatham, NY called Dan's Diner. It is so fun to sit at the counter, chat with the cook and locals inside and watch them prepare my breakfast on the grill. $10 including the tip and I'm stuffed and ready for a nap. image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg
     
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  2. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    We really enjoy the old New England diners.
     
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  3. RonS

    RonS Member

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    Looks like a totally cool place. Classic New England dinner. I'm jealous. Thanks for posting this. :D
     
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  4. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    Wow, brilliant and great pictures.
     
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  5. WilliamJ

    WilliamJ Active Member

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    Diners are absolutely awesome! We need to have some type of thread that lists them.

    First off for me would be those that serve scrapple- any takers?
     
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  6. WilliamJ

    WilliamJ Active Member

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    Dumfries Cafe- Harold & Cathy, owners, Dumfries, Va
     
  7. WilliamJ

    WilliamJ Active Member

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    Route 29 Diner, Arlington, VA
     
  8. darrell

    darrell Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I lived in Allentown, PA for 2 years and am full German blood so know what scrapple is and actually enjoy it but I'd guess most do not know what it is and once they do might not even try it.

    http://www.foodwine.com/food/sleuth/0998/scrapple.html
     
  9. WilliamJ

    WilliamJ Active Member

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    Learned how to fly out of ABE; did undergrad at ESSU...

    Have introduced my grandkids to scrapple- hopefully not a lost taste!
     
  10. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    I'm half German blood and lived in DuBois Pa. 5.5 years. Unfortunately for me, my full blood German relatives did not speak the language around us kids so we could learn it, or did they cook German food.
     
  11. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    My father drove a truck, and in Central Ohio in the late 50's early 60's there were lots of truck stop diners. Most often the same narrow structure, with the bench. Others branched out to rooms with tables.
    I really liked getting the hot chocolate (I was much younger then) in the coffee cups. They were "stoneware", generous, squared off plain shape, heavy, very thick. I would really like to get some of these today.
    I also remember the glass cases that held small plates in a stack with pieces of pie or doughnuts. These cases generally sat next to a juke box head unit.
    The seats were generally round with no backs, and bolted to the floor.
    The food was grilled or fried, and the portions were ample. I don't think any of it was "special", just plain, normal, ordinary.
    These photos really brought the memories back for me.
     
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  12. fischetg

    fischetg Active Member

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    Dan's Diner is a great place, not too far from me. Yes, we are fortunate to have diners in this part of the country. The absolute best diner is in Worcester MA. The Miss Worcester Diner. In a seedy neighborhood, with hard-core ladies serving up great food. Amazing! exterior.jpg interior.jpg Miss Worcester food.jpg Owners MWD.jpg
     
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  13. mreeter

    mreeter Active Member

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    Damn, you guys are making me hungry! We used to have small Diners and Cafes in the little Midwestern town I grew up in. Everything was made from scratch with local Farm Fresh ingredients. The patrons were hard working folks with a big appetite and a small wallet.

    Unfortunately they are all but gone now, the last time I visited there, the Fast Food Chains and the like have taken over. Be thankful for the Diners that are still left and are within a days ride!
     
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  14. RonS

    RonS Member

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  15. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

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    Darrell,

    Did you really call it scrapple? Be honest. There was a different name........??

    It's like those city folks that call souse ........ Headcheese!
     
  16. darrell

    darrell Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Always called it scrapple around the family or anywhere I've been. I have never heard another term used for it. Honestly. Must be my true German ansistory.
     
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  17. UncleBob

    UncleBob Member

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    Similar recipe and it's called Livermush in our area.
     
  18. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

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    The PA dutch term is Ponhaus. A true German immigrant creation.....No respectable German in Germany would found making his food from the feed bins (corn meal) for the pigs!
     
  19. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

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    I never knew liverwurst was stuffed in a casing until I went to the big city after graduating college. As a kid, liverwurst was a grey "cake" of congealed liver bits (boiled in a kettle) that was heated with water to form a gravy and served over pancakes or waffles. Sounds like your Livermush
     
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  20. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    Oh gawd. I thought the Scotts with battered deep fried pizza slices and Mars bars were in the running for the most revolting foods, but the congealed liver bits over pancakes would be right up there.
     

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