No customization options are available.

The smell of a new BMW bike.

Discussion in 'R1200RS Versus The Competition' started by dkjkwood, Jul 18, 2017.

  1. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

    Messages:
    2,689
    Likes Received:
    1,973
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I was always told that the old K-bikes always did that. A smoking K-bike in the morning was a BMW feature that let you know that was running. And perhaps a signal from BMW not to park the bike on the side stand (which supposedly allowed any oil that accumulated behind the pistons to find its way past the ring gap and into the combustion chamber after an evening of rest).
     
  2. Jim Evans

    Jim Evans Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    773
    Likes Received:
    469
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ah, the fine smell of chateau de Thames embankment. Keeps me astonishingly regular.
     
  3. shorn sheep

    shorn sheep Active Member

    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    93
    Trophy Points:
    28
    My K100rs was the same, you get that when you put a car engine into a bike sideways! The choice was dislocate your spine putting it on the center stand or leave on the sidestand and choke on oil smoke. Was still one of my favorite bikes though:)
     
    Richard230 and Dan smith like this.
  4. Dan smith

    Dan smith Active Member

    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    28
    So that's where it may come from ?
    I have always loved, Asian engine technology, very rarely.do those engines , leak inside or outside , But their vehicles are also lacking in personality :(
     
  5. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

    Messages:
    2,689
    Likes Received:
    1,973
    Trophy Points:
    113
    BMW mostly solved the smoking problem in the later K-bikes by pinning the piston oil rings at 120 degrees so that there were no gaps for the oil to find its way into the cylinder, or so I have read. The 2-valve K-bikes apparently used oil rings that could rotate and sometimes the gap would end up at the bottom side of the cylinder bore. I owned a 1991 K100RS 4-valve for 8 years and it didn't smoke, but then I rarely left it on the side stand overnight.
     
    shorn sheep likes this.
  6. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,686
    Likes Received:
    1,777
    Trophy Points:
    113
    If you don't have tge centre stand, do you have a shop stand? Both are useful.
     
  7. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    1,383
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Our 1987 K75T bikes smoked bad when parked on the sidestand. Our 1991 K75Ss did not smoke and I was told they didn't because of the pinned rings.
    I was surprised when our 2003 K1200RS bikes smoked once in awhile when parked on the sidestand over night.
     
    Dan smith likes this.
  8. Dan smith

    Dan smith Active Member

    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Pinned rings keeps the ring from rotating, but if the pin falls out it's not pritty!
     
  9. shorn sheep

    shorn sheep Active Member

    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    93
    Trophy Points:
    28
    yep i still have the stand, I put in on without the spring or circlips when i want to work on the bike, the rest of the time its on the sidestand quietly leaking oil into the left cylinder
     
    Dan smith likes this.
  10. Brimstone Mahone

    Brimstone Mahone Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    267
    Likes Received:
    273
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Well... really there should be no excess oil draining into the the down-hill cylinder unless the sump is GROSSLY over-full. The level in the sump doesn't get to within several inches of the lowest portion of the crankshaft, let alone all the way up to cylinder level.

    Bad rings/valve guides/valve seals...
     
  11. shorn sheep

    shorn sheep Active Member

    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    93
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Actually the oil level was still within the sight window, the bike doesn't seem to ever need oil added so I'm thinking it must be just whatever oil is lining the bore behind the piston when the engine is turned off, which then runs down and eventually finds its way past the rings when the engine cools and things contract. It only puffs smoke sometimes on startup so it might be that it depends on where the piston stops, like if the piston was at bottom dead center for example there would be very little oil-lined bore behind the piston so less oil could accumulate. I guess it's a downside of horizontal cylinders
     
Loading...

Share This Page