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Speed limits in France

Discussion in 'Off Topic Section' started by Graham Lewis, Jan 6, 2018.

  1. Graham Lewis

    Graham Lewis Active Member Contributor

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    Just read that it likely that France will lower their national road single carriage speed limit from 90 kph to 80 kph. with France having the same love of speed cameras as the UK. maybe one of the good things about Brexit might be that any speeding tickets may not follows us back to the UK but doubt it.
     
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  2. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    Speed camera density seems to vary depending on the region. On my trip to Brittany I only noticed one speed camera and that was on the Brest ring road. Unlike Champagne Ardennes where they seem to be quite common - I was setting off front facing camera like a good un last summer, traveling from St Quentin across country to Beaulieu en Argonne. Sadly, these seem to be being replaced by rearward facing ones. Burgundy is much the same but the Jura was like Brittany. This trip was in June and I have not received any tickets in the post yet.
    I have always noticed ever since I have been visiting France in the mid 1990s that the A26 Autoroute through Champagne Ardennes between Reims and St Quentin has a higher density of radar traps. You can quite often pass a man with a tripod (who you didn't see before he had his laser speed rifle on you) and then find the next Aire has a police van and a couple of motorcyclists processing their victims.
    At least if you get caught speeding in France you just pay a tax. There are no implications for your licence or future insurance premiums. The French are still lightweights in terms of enforcement for motoring offences compared to Austria, Germany and Switzerland. The French just want the cash. The Swiss & Germans will be looking to see if they can impound your bike for non-approved modifications and the Austrians are just robbing bastards who prosecute petty offences just to raise cash. Don't you dare filter to the front of a traffic light queue in Lienz.
     
  3. Graham Lewis

    Graham Lewis Active Member Contributor

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    Wessie so so true but when you ask me where I want to go on my bike I will say France, Germany, and the rest of europe maybe to old to learn!!
     
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  4. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    None of the above puts me off going either. I'm off to the Ardennes at Easter and Germany in June. I've got away with it so far, just one lecture from some Black Forest police but travelling companions have fared less well, but they were hooligans on ZX10R, GSXR & MV Agusta. I am more likely to be on a stealthy Q bike and keep away from their shenanigans.
     
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  5. Graham Lewis

    Graham Lewis Active Member Contributor

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    Sadly I will only be able to do the TT this year, lats year managed to do Germany stayed near Freiburg and a bit of France Voseges last year amazing roads. Still need to get to the french alps as my last time attempting that I broke down half way through France and did the rest of the holiday in a Peugeot 208.
     
  6. Yoda

    Yoda Active Member

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    There are no good things about Brexit :mad:
     
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  7. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    Out of curiosity, what would the tax be for 35 kph over the limit?
     
  8. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    That is 49.something miles per hour FFS.....
     
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  9. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    typically 90 euros if stopped by a gendarme

    like the UK, once you go over a certain % over the limit then you risk moving from civil enforcement to a criminal prosecution.

    I have not had to pay any extra tax in France but this article covers the rates: seems the fine is fixed unless you are >50kph over the limit, then you could get dragged to a tribunal.
    https://www.justlanded.co.uk/english/France/Articles/Travel-Leisure/Traffic-Police
    Most people I know who have been stopped have been allowed to go on their way once they produce the cash - you may have to surrender your passport whilst you ride to the nearest ATM. That includes people doing 150mph on an autoroute: just cough the 90 euros and the gendarme is happy. If they insist on you appearing at a Tribunal then they would have a lot of extra work plus you might not turn up. This flexible approach used to happen in the UK when we actually had traffic police: told to calm down and given a fixed penalty ticket with 3 points even if well over 100mph. Camera prosecutions are less flexible as computers and jobsworth bureaucrats are involved.
     
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  10. Martien

    Martien Member

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    Interesting as always, will be in France as well this year a couple of times. Found this website, it has a good overview of all fines: http://english.controleradar.org/speeding-fines.php

    My rule of thumb is always to ride around max speed +20 kph (on speedometer) to get a maximum value for money ;), since amount is the same for +1 or +19 kph. And never go over +50 kph, that is stupid and expensive in any country...

    Speeding fines in France
    Foreigner or not, speeding is punishable by law (usual speed limits). Having a french driving licence or not, driving a vehicle with french driving plates or not, will make a difference in the outcome:
    - You are arrested by the police or gendarmerie for moderate speeding. Fine to be paid on the spot. Points lost if french driving licence.
    - You are arrested by the police or gendarmerie for inmoderate speeding (in excess of 50km/h). Fine to be paid, licence confiscated, vehicle might be impounded.
    - You are caught speeding by a speed camera but not arrested with a foreign registered car. You are not likely to ever have to pay the fine, except if you are from Luxembourg. For now. Check here for more.

    Speeding by less than 20 km/h (12 mph)
    • Fine (0) : 68 euros (or 45 if you pay quickly, see below)
    • License points loss : 1 point
    • License suspension : none
    if however the speed limit is lower than 50 km/h (31 mph)
    • Fine (1) : 135 euros (or 90 if you pay quickly, see below)
    • License points loss : 1 point
    • License suspension : none
    Speeding between 20 km/h and 30 km/h (12 mph to 19 mph)
    • Fine (1) : 135 euros (or 90 if you pay quickly, see below)
    • License points loss: 2 points
    • License suspension (2) : none
    Speeding between 30 km/h and 40 km/h (19 mph to 25 mph)
    • Fine (1) : 135 euros (or 90 if you pay quickly, see below)
    • License points loss: 3 points
    • License suspension (2) : 3 years
    Speeding between 40 km/h and 50 km/h (25 mph to 31 mph)
    • Fine (1) : 135 euros (or 90 if you pay quickly, see below)
    • License points loss: 4 points
    • License suspension (2) : 3 years
    Speeding by more than 50 km/h (31 mph)
    • Fine (2) : 1500 euros
    • License points loss: 6 points
    • License suspension (2) : 3 years
    Second offence speeding by more than 50 km/h (31 mph)
    • Jail (2) : 3 months
    • Fine (2) : 3750 euros
    • License points loss: 6 points
    • License suspension (2) : 3 years
    (0) The fine is 68 euros, however if paid in less than 15 days it is 45 euros, and if paid in more than 45 days it is 180 euros. The maximum possible being 450 euros (if it goes into trial).
    (1) The fine is 135 euros, however if paid in less than 15 days it is 90 euros, and if paid in more than 45 days it is 375 euros. The maximum possible being 750 euros (if it goes into trial).
    (2) maximum.
     
  11. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    You don't advocate matching the numbers on my mph speedo to the prevailing speed limit, then?

    "Pardon, mussewer? Le noombrer sur la signe et aussi le noombrer sur mon metre de veetesse. Ici. Non?"
     
  12. Martien

    Martien Member

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    You mean doing 90 mph on an N road and 130 mph on an Autoroute in France? :rolleyes:

    And don't you have both MPH and KPH indicated on the speedo?
     
  13. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    Maybe. Seems a quite reasonable approach. Swiss registered Audis go faster.

    On my RS, probably but I don't use the dial as I cannot focus on the tiny numbers. On my Triumph - digital speedo only which might be switchable from mph to kph, but that's not the point I was making...
     

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