No customization options are available.

Slow speed issues

Discussion in 'R1200RS Versus The Competition' started by Twistyguy, Nov 3, 2017.

  1. PaulB_UK

    PaulB_UK Active Member

    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    150
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I think you need to book a 2 to 3 hour test ride. A whole morning or afternoon. 15 to 20 minutes is nowhere near long enough to judge the character of the bike, and if it's the right bike for you or not.
    No one can be expected to make such a major purchase decision based on a 15 to 20 minutes test ride.
    Phone around dealers and book an appointment. Tell them you want a *proper* test ride, not just a "round the block" ride.
    If you have a "significant other" who will sit on the back at any point, take them along. But maybe drop them home as the first part of the test ride, and take the twisty route back to the dealer by yourself :)

    Cheers

    Paul B.

     
    Bravo and Twistyguy like this.
  2. mrj

    mrj Member

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    50
    Trophy Points:
    18
    The RS is very stable and easy going, I believe. That's the reason I got one. I tried a Kawasaki Z1000SX, then I was about to buy a BMW S1000XR, but when I tested the R1200RS I felt in love with it, especially on twisty roads (and we have plenty of those where I live in the French Riviera). The D-ESA works very well and gives you comfort on road mode or more stability and control on dynamic mode. No problem whether on slow speed or not.
    Just note the shifter-pro works better on higher engine speed (say > 3000 rpm). It's a bit clunky otherwise. Now I'm used to it, but it's an option you can do without (I really enjoy it most when using the heated grips, so I don't need to move my fingers off to de-clutch).
    Now, if you're used to the R, yes the RS feels a little less agile (e.g. in town traffic) and feels a little heavier (it is, in fact). But it's much more adapted to long trips as it feels more comfortable (wind protection...) and speed (better driver position I think, more stability).
    As others said, a bike choice remains a very intimate thing. For me, the RS is the best, most balanced, one at the moment.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2017
    ray2, Last, Twistyguy and 1 other person like this.
  3. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    977
    Likes Received:
    802
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Chevy Chase, MD., That's, nominally, 1 or 2 hrs from an interesting road or a good hairpin.

    Most of my riding is either traversing the ridges of central Pennsylvania or the old state routes on the Allegheny plateau to the north. Think West Virginia, but with locals that have more teeth. Now I've never written a book or maintained a blog about motorcycles, but I have ridden them for 46-yrs in this back-wood expanse of nothingness. Up and over those ridges. Typically, a hair-pin on both sides, and slaloming between the Amish buggies.

    The R12RS works quite well for me. Could the seat be a 1/2-inch higher? Yes. Is there a better windshield for Interstate miles? Most likely. Is there an issue with low speed handling? I haven't experienced it in 9600-miles.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2017
  4. Twistyguy

    Twistyguy New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
     
  5. TexasJock

    TexasJock Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I use my RS for everything. Commuting, touring, twisties and track days. If you have any doubt about the RS being a capable bike in tight turns take it from me it is absolutely fine. This year the RS has been on 5 track days and I love it. Each time I go to get my track bike ready I end up saying to myself lets just take the RS.

    The low c of g helps hide the feeling of weight and the massive torque compared to more dedicated sports bikes make it more than capable of having fun in a more relaxed, maybe lazy way. The quick shift down with the slipper clutch is the biggest advantage I find when going quick. The way you can brake late and just bang in down a few gears without even having to think about rev matching or controlling rear lock up is fantastic.

    Great all round bike.

    Brian
     
    Bill the Cat, ray2, mrj and 3 others like this.
  6. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

    Messages:
    3,983
    Likes Received:
    2,524
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Thanks. That is also my approach ... fast in the straightaways (well as fast as I care to ride on a given day). brake fairly hard as I get into the immediate approach of the turn, decrease the brake and trail brake or even apply the right hand brake depending on speed in the turn half way through the turn, then for the second half I am off the brake and on the gas, smoothly powering out of the turn. Don't hang off the bike much as there is no need the way I ride.

    Keeping your riding style as background info, there is no issue with this bike in the twisties, and as mentioned before there is no issue in hairpin turns. It will not fall into turns like a little roadster (it can't, and that is not a bad thing) but it will get you to the twisties fast and safely, and when you get there it will handle the curves very well indeed. A do-it-all bike.
     
    Twistyguy likes this.
  7. Twistyguy

    Twistyguy New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    It’s all about compromise. The big things I want from my next bike:
    1) low end torque (RS has plenty)
    2) flickable (RS and RT are good, not great. R and KTM are better)
    3) Good looking (RS is one of the best looking bikes out there imo. I’m not a huge fan of the R12R and RT looks or the KTM)
    4) Shaft drive (I hate chain maintenance. RS, RT and R have it, KTM doesn’t)
    5) Weather protection (RS is the better than R and KTM, RT is better)
    6) Comfort for long interstate rides to get to western Carolina and beyond (RS is the best of the three. The RT is even better. But there’s something about a bike with speakers in the dash and a radio antenna that really turns me off! The bike makes me feel old when I rode it.)
    7) Boxer engine (R, RS, RT have it, S1000XR, KTM doesn’t)
    8) Big saddle bags (R, RS, RT have them, S1000XR and KTM don’t).

    There simply isn’t a perfect bike out there for me. But probably the RS comes closest. Do I wish it had a shorter wheel base and less rake like the R, yes. But on the whole, it is probably the best bike for me. I just have to test ride the hell out of it and convince myself it can handle well what I throw at it. Otherwise I’ll probably go with an R.
     
  8. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

    Messages:
    3,983
    Likes Received:
    2,524
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Agree with the above, of course. Good luck in the acquisition.
     
    Jim Evans likes this.
  9. Twistyguy

    Twistyguy New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Excellent! BTW, I only trail brake with the hand brake—it’s linked and is much safer than using the rear brake to trail brake.
     
  10. Peter Burridge

    Peter Burridge Well-Known Member Contributor

    Messages:
    2,783
    Likes Received:
    1,521
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I'd go so far to say that Ken is actually wrong, no matter how good a rider he is. My advice would be don't be concerned, consciously counter steer and take control.

    Peter
     
    ray2 likes this.
  11. Phinj

    Phinj Active Member

    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    28
    It is at least a 4 hr ride to decent roads for me.
    I rode 600+ miles of interstate and 4 lane (US 13 to 58 to I85 to I40 to 75) from DE to NC (KSL in Stecoah NC)
    Does it all. Does it all well. My Wife is a nervous short mile passenger, done deal, went 2 hours up and back NC19.
    This is the best all arounder out, with the best brand, the quirks to me make it lovable.

    There is no Question..
     
  12. SauRoN

    SauRoN Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,020
    Likes Received:
    429
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Yeah what on earth is he talking about here...

    Where is the complexity? Or "menu" for that matter?


    Can't agree on these slow speed handling issues, so there must be something wrong with that bike. It's more or on par balanced than just about anything else I've ridden outside of maybe the Multistrada.

    I can agree with the point about the indicator self-cancelling. After more than a year with the bike I also didn't know it had that feature...
     
  13. mrj

    mrj Member

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    50
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Said it on another thread: the self-cancelling indicator just helps when you forget cancelling manually. So you wouldn't normally notice since most of the time you don't forget and when you forget... you've forgotten and won't remember afterward.
    If it were tuned to cancel sooner (which the manual says you can ask your dealer to do) you would notice because it would be sometimes too soon (I had the problem on my previous F800GT and had sometimes to turn the indicator on again, especially when I wanted to signal earlier I will leave the freeway at the next exit).
    So it's not perfect, but better tuned long than short.
     
  14. carsten

    carsten New Member

    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    3
    if there ever is or was any issues with riding tight twistys on an Rs,
    ( i´ve had an R before )
    just put the RS on CRA3s
    you`ll notice a massive difference
     
    Roadnwater, ray2 and Peter Burridge like this.
  15. Peter Burridge

    Peter Burridge Well-Known Member Contributor

    Messages:
    2,783
    Likes Received:
    1,521
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I would if I knew that they were.
     
    carsten likes this.
  16. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    623
    Likes Received:
    545
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Continental road attack 3s....great TLA.
     
  17. carsten

    carsten New Member

    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    3
    ;)
    know, what you mean.
    but....as i changed from the MPR4s, on which the bike was delivered, ´cause i had severell massive slides
    all i can say is that there`s a huge difference ,espacially on the front tire in slower tight curves.
    grip`s fantastic, simular to the Pirellis i had on the R
    but that`s just my 50 cts;)
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2017
  18. Roadnwater

    Roadnwater Active Member

    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Are you guys using the Gt version of the Conti RA3 as is recommended on the Conti website or the regular stiffness.
     
  19. carsten

    carsten New Member

    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    3
    GT Version
    About 1500 km on the clock
     

    Attached Files:

  20. Vtbob

    Vtbob Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    468
    Likes Received:
    346
    Trophy Points:
    63
    The only difference in geometry is the front axle placement in the front fork. (look at it..about .5 inches forward) If you want R geometry use the R front forks.
     
    Twistyguy, ray2 and Peter Burridge like this.
Loading...

Share This Page