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RS/ S1000R head scratching

Discussion in 'R1200RS Versus The Competition' started by Ollybolly, May 2, 2016.

  1. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    BMW Owner's News has a nice little review (again) of the RS in the latest edition. The author and experienced BMW rider (Ted Moyer) makes his comments following a few hundred mile ride in the Birmingham Alabama area. He was particularly impressed with the handling, espeically since he initially expected less from the conventional front suspension vs telelever.
     
  2. Ollybolly

    Ollybolly New Member

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    Cheers Andy. Did take a (very) quick look at the XR but I'm not keen on the adventure-style upright position. The wide bars also don't suit me filtering through town and, last but not least, the cost! Reckon the much cheaper R with a screen for a bit of token protection would be the way I'd go if I went down the S1000 route.

    Going to look up the article all the same! :)
     
  3. Troppo

    Troppo Member

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    Hello.

    I own an S1000R, a current GS and an RT. I used to ride a street triple r.

    I am an Aussie, but have ridden extensively and regularly in London and the home counties.

    The S1000R is not very suited to commuting, IMHO, particularly in the diabolical London traffic. The clutch is quite heavy. There is zero weather protection - it would be a right bastard in December at 0600 on the M25! :rolleyes:
     
  4. Troppo

    Troppo Member

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    I hit submit too quickly!

    The RS is a great all rounder, the boxer has lots of low down grunt and the relatively narrow bars would make it good for filtering over say a GS (which is the logical first choice).

    You have some weather protection, a relatively light clutch, no chain and the cruise control for the M25 (ha!..as if...;)).

    The only downside for your application would be the relatively forward riding possie, but this can be easily overcome with some risers.
     
  5. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    You can edit your post anytime afterwards, even after it has been posted for months. :)

    Agree that the RS is an excellent commuter, although if you are in a downtown-type commute a scooter would be best. If your commute involves anything that has a straight stretch of road more than a couple of blocks long then the scooter advantage quickly diminishes. :)
     
  6. Troppo

    Troppo Member

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    A scooter on the M25 would be suicidal....:D
     
  7. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Ahhhh ... why not live a little on the wild side ...? :D
     
  8. saizou

    saizou Member

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    It's still garbage and will always be garbage. I have to glance at the speedometer for 1-2s to get a reading, and given how quick the bike accelerates with a gentle roll of the throttle, my face is glued to the dash most of the time. My solution for the time being is get the Navigator 5 and use the speed feature.

    I'm thinking about tapping the speed sensor and run a separate digital speedometer gauge. Finding a clean and aesthetic way of implementing it will be the most difficult part.
     
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  9. Troppo

    Troppo Member

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    Why not just run the dash mode that gives you digital speed readout?
     
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  10. Willy

    Willy Well-Known Member

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    I am well pleased with the dash on the RS. People keep going on about an analogue tacho, you really don't need a tacho on the RS, all that grunt it pulls from anywhere, there isn't a power band as such. Once you know where the critical numbers are, 30, 40, 70 mph etc it's easy, 8 o'clock = 40, 9 o'clock= 60, 11 o'clock = 100 :D:D. You can of course put the dash into touring mode and get the digital readout. Forget the tacho it's a boxer!! The dash also has wealth of info that can be displayed and easily toggled between, tyre pressure, fuel range etc. If I am to be picky on the speedo they could have spaced the numbers in 20mph divisions to make it less crowded maybe. One thing I am not sure about is the colour reversal at night, but I haven't done much night riding yet so I will reserve judgement on that. Overall very happy with the dash *****:)
     
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  11. Willy

    Willy Well-Known Member

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    Hey GG that's the first I've seen the words scooter and advantage used in the same sentence;)
     
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  12. Barnesyboy

    Barnesyboy Active Member

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    I'm in the "what's the problem with the dash camp". The only time I glance at it is when approaching urban areas, 50, 40 and 30. Other than that it's just ride the thing. When i'm pressing on a bit it'll be third and fourth looking up the road and certainly not down at speedo, wafting along it's 4th and 5th depending again on situation. If you are in the right gear for the speed you really should feel it without having to check.
     
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  13. oscarguitar

    oscarguitar Well-Known Member

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    Agreed. Once you have done a few miles on the thing you'll stop worrying about it and ride by the seat of your pants. (Unless you're in the "this seat is too -insert issue here - camp)
    I actually tried out Style 2 and 3 this week (after 8500 miles I thought I better have a look) but went back to Style 1 after 40 miles and ignoring it as usual.
     
  14. Barnesyboy

    Barnesyboy Active Member

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    I
    I've tried the others but back on 1, it works for me.
     
  15. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Could not have said it better myself. I guess it is simply popular to jump on the "analog tachometer bandwagon" for whatever reason (which I will keep to myself publicly) but in truth, how many of us watch the tach an think, "Oh I must wait until I hit xxxx revs before I change up/down so that I can extract the most out of my engine". Balls I say. You ride by feel and that is all there is to it. You feel the bike and change when it feels right. No need for tach at all. I looked at mine for the first time on this morning's commute because it felt sweet as was blasting onto an on ramp and I just wondered what rev range that was (7-8000, can't remember exactly, its that important) and then promptly looked back on the road where my attention must be.

    Far more important is the speedometer, and only because you need to behave in regard to the speed limit. If I had an audible reminder of speed overages I would not need a speedometer either. Ride at what the road and traffic conditions will bear is typically my approach. Again ... you have to feel the bike and look at the situation all around. Not at the instruments.

    To each his own.
     
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  16. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Heheheh ... scooters have their place I guess, and like minivans they make so much sense in certain situations that despite the "Ugh" factor they are often the best tool for the job. Besides, they always get a cheery reaction from me. :) Who else are we goong to smile / laugh at? :)
     
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  17. Ollybolly

    Ollybolly New Member

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    Thanks. My thoughts exactly. What you describe (especially 6am December blasts up M25) are what are driving me to change my bike. S1000 makes no sense at all. But my heart keeps trying to jam that round peg in the square hole. For presumably the same reasons you bought yours (sadly at this stage I can only own 1 bike, otherwise I'd take both).

    So looking for a great all rounder, and the more I think about it, more I'm convinced I need to apply that test of 'what bike would I want in my driveway on a wet and windy December morning.?' It isn't a S1000, or indeed a scooter!
     
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  18. Ollybolly

    Ollybolly New Member

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    I really like the default riding position as is: no need for risers just yet. Everything else: entirely agree!
     
  19. Troppo

    Troppo Member

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    Only you can decide, mate.... Mind you, the S1000 does get along rather well....

    ;-)
     
  20. fischetg

    fischetg Active Member

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    OMG! I was in a similar quandary. I was on a Speed Triple for a few years, I longed for some protection on distance rides and commutes, yet I still enjoy sporty character. I tested the S1000R and absolutely loved it. I did not love the R1200RS.

    But after some difficult deliberation, the shaft drive, less vibration and the windscreen weighted the decision heavily. If I had the room, there would be a S1000R in my garage as well. On the cold and damp mornings, on the 5th hour of long rides and on the days I am hauling groceries, I reflect and know I made the best decision. The bike will grow on you and you will slowly fall in love with it.

    The S1000R is the extroverted narcissist, so alluring and exciting, but cannot support your needs; in tough situations it reveals its' blatant shortcomings. The R1200RS is the introverted, unexciting date that slowly reveals the character qualities of providing for all of your needs, in all conditions, for a very long time.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2016
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