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riding in france

Discussion in 'UK Riders' started by neil wheelhouse, Apr 3, 2017.

  1. Keith R

    Keith R Member

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    Not necessarily. I have a friend who came very close to confiscation. Their fines can also be very hefty if exceeding the speed limit by more than 50kph. Check out the following link. Some eye watering penalties listed.

    https://www.french-property.com/guides/france/driving-in-france/driving-offences/
     
  2. Keith R

    Keith R Member

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    I agree it is very convenient of the French to post their speed limits in MPH . I have a friend who was very lucky not to have his bike confiscated a couple years of years ago. Generally speaking I have found that using minor roads and not exceeding the limit through towns and villages (particular on a Sunday where the police seem to be around more) means that you can really enjoy the roads with very little chance of getting into trouble. I have set off a forward facing camera on a couple of occasions. Quite a bright flash!
     
  3. boxter

    boxter Active Member

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    Last year i triggered two cameras in France and one in Germany, heard nothing from it, all were taking pictures from rear and were tiny little posts maybe 3 ft high.

    From early this year the UK and other European countries have come to an agreement on cross border procecutions, so no escape now.

    Those who are caught with speed camera locating equipment, ( and i have not heard of anyone that has been done ) can and will lose the equipment, it is confiscated, this makes me wonder about cars with built in detection / warnings!!


    Ged
     
  4. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    My built in car unit just comes up with the message "dangerous road" or something similar. The software clearly recognises that the car is in France and messages accordingly. My portable Garmin does the same.

    Last time I checked (I drive in EU at least twice per month) there was no reciprocal agreement with the U.K. ....Uk gov has until May this year to implement.......if you are in your own vehicle...I might be wrong though. Hire car companies however, are a different kettle of poisson........they will hand your details to the authorities and send you an admin bill for the privilege .......and then you'll get the fine
     
  5. DJBee

    DJBee Active Member

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    Riding in France is wonderful but not quite as wonderful as it used to be perhaps. The countryside is stunning and if you know a little French, your reception will be transformed.

    Watch out for this on Autoroutes: Tiny camera on tiny tripod set by the side of one of the small service areas used by maintenance people etc. There will be a lead going from the tripod/camera to a Police or Gendarme car. They phone ahead to the next Péage where a Gendarme with a list checks cars (and bikes, although I have not seen this) and waves the speeders into a naughty area for whatever punishment they have coming. Most people would never see the cameras!

    Bonne route!
     
  6. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    I am not aware of a reciprocal either
     
  7. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    as stated earlier - also before an Aire (rest area) where they will have a motorcycle a waiting km down the road to bring you in. Seen this quite often between St Quentin & Reims on the A26
     
  8. Hugh

    Hugh Member

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    Can anyone give any advice about the Peage on the Autoroutes? On my car I have a dongle that means I can zip through the Peage barriers but on a bike not sure this is a straight forward and don't want to pay car rates
     
  9. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    Snap. I have always wanted to work out how to do this but have never managed it. Seems you need another account completely
     
  10. Stef

    Stef Active Member

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    Some PEAGE lanes are marked with a sign "forbidden for motocycles". These are not equiped to make a difference between car and bike and will charge you car rates.

    Strictly respect speed limit approaching PEAGE, even when they seem very low. Police waits after PEAGE. :)
     
  11. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    Check the péage display - for a bike it should read class 5 - if it does not, press the button and shout, "motard, classe cinq" when the operator speaks.
    Worked fine today on the A26 - took a ticket south of the tunnel and then paid my 8 euros with a Mastercard when arriving in St Quentin. Took under 2 hours. Avoiding the A26 would take nearly 3 hours. From tomorrow, the satnav is set for "avoid tolls" for 5 days.

    Of course, on a bike using the ticket/credit card is easier than a car - TAG makes sense in a UK car especially if travelling alone as you are sat the wrong side to use the ticket & credit card machines.
     
  12. edtxw01

    edtxw01 Active Member

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    I've just found out about the new low emissions rules which came into effect on 1st April:

    Low emission zones have been introduced in Paris, Lyon and Grenoble.

    • Access to all types of vehicles including passenger cars and motorcycles is restricted.
     
  13. Keith R

    Keith R Member

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    It is easy to get a certificate if you are planning to go to one of the affected areas. Costs just over £4. Link is below:

    https://www.certificat-air.gouv.fr/en/
     
  14. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    yes, got one - well the PDF but no sticker yet.

    On another matter, I seem to have been photographed quite a few times today on my way to Vichy. They are still using conventional flashes in some areas and they aren't half bright when you get a face full, even if it is across the other side of the road.
     
  15. folagana

    folagana Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Some of you already ride in france, does you know if it is necessary to use gloves with EN13594 certification since november 2016?
     
  16. Stef

    Stef Active Member

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    look at the end of http://moto-securite.fr/gants-obligatoires/
    yes and CE-label should be sufficiant.
     
    folagana likes this.
  17. folagana

    folagana Well-Known Member Contributor

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  18. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    OMG - have they seriously got nothing better got worry about?????
     
  19. Stef

    Stef Active Member

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    All the new requirements are not a real problem:
    -Reflectors on helmets:no for non-French riders
    -Reflectors on jacket: small and normally prsent in everey decent jacket
    -Gloves: every decent motocycle gloves has CE.
    So, no panic.
     
  20. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    All gloves sold in the EU for "protective use" be they for building sites or riding motorcycles must have the requisite CE mark or EN number. Same with helmets or armour in jackets. A gendarme is unlikely to check and loads of people were riding with no gloves on the Cote d'Azur this last week, but your hands are going to be making contact with the ground if you have a spill as it is instinct to put them out.
     
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