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R1200RS VS R1200RS

Discussion in 'General R1200RS Discussions' started by Brimstone Mahone, Feb 3, 2018.

  1. Brimstone Mahone

    Brimstone Mahone Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone done some touring on both bikes? We are looking at bikes to purchase in the UK - We will be spending 5 months/per year there and want to buy bikes suitable for touring throughout the UK and Europe. I love my RS for Texas and the associated Hill Country but wonder if the RT would be a better choice as an overall bike for the UK/Europe. Any thoughts? I realize this is an RS site so there may well be an inherent bias toward the RS but I'm hoping there are some objective folks here who can offer some input.
     
  2. Phillo

    Phillo Active Member

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    Having had a RT and now a RS if I was intending to do the sort of touring you intend to do...long distances...all weather I would go with the RT :)
     
  3. edward barkan

    edward barkan Member

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    I haven't toured on an RT, but have always been interested in them so have taken test rides several times. The main reason I never bought one is, strangely enough, the main reason many other people do buy them. Specifically, the big fairing and windshield on the RT creates a big pocket of still air around the rider. That's fine when it's raining or cold, but unbearable in warm weather.
    Recently, when I took my RS for service, I borrowed an RT. I had been perfectly comfortable riding to the dealer with a mesh jacket on the RS, but was way too hot on the RT, even with the windshield all the way down. Too bad because it's a nice bike otherwise. Maybe it's better with a smaller screen.
    I also didn't like the seat as much on the RT, but that's a personal choice and you probably can't make a judgement about that without riding it yourself. Probably a good idea to try to take a long test ride in weather conditions similar to what you expect in Europe before making a decision.
    One thing that is very nice about the RT is the central locking, so you don't ever need to dig out your key even to lock and unlock the luggage. I had a K1600GT with that feature and liked it.
    On the other hand, the Nav system doesn't lock onto the RT like it does on the K16 or the RS, so you will have to be careful about leaving it on the bike when it's unattended.
     
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  4. Alda

    Alda Active Member

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    R1200RS VS R1200RS
    No contest really.
     
  5. DABs

    DABs Active Member

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    If you want an 'overall' bike for UK/Europe, then RS it is.
    If, however, you want a 'touring' bike for UK/Europe, then RT it is, due to better wind & rain protection.

    Dave
     
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  6. Brimstone Mahone

    Brimstone Mahone Well-Known Member

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    "R1200RS VS R1200RS" Sorry for the typo on my post heading. Glad most folks were able to decipher it based on my text! RS vs RT!

    I was initially thinking of maybe the F800GT but I don't think that will work for me. So it's RS vs RT; I'd probably buy a used one in the UK/keep it there. There are a lot more choices for an RT, simply because they've been around longer. What sort of mileage on a used bike would be a concern on these Boxer twins. I have never owned one until two years ago (R9T and now my RS) so I have no experience regarding longevity. I would want a bike that mileage-wise there would be no concern. I realize condition/care is a huge issue but assuming responsible care, what sort of mileage on a used bike should I be comfortable with?
     
  7. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    My two penneth - RS is more agile and dynamic - only advantage of the RT would be mega distances in crap weather. Not sure if you're mentally thinking of US highways , but the distances in the UK/Northern Europe are not as big so benefits of RT are diminished.
     
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  8. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

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    Are you really so old that you need a RT?
     
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  9. TPadden

    TPadden Member

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    I own both, the reason I bought the RS was because I liked the wethead RT so much. If I could keep only one it would be the RT because it does EVERYTHING so well. If I had the RT and were looking to buy an additional bike it would be the RS again. The RS is lighter and slightly more fun to ride, the RT is more comfortable. For me it's not necessarily the distance but the time spent travelling. For any trip of 4-5 days or less the RS would do fine, but I annually take several multi-week, greater than 4,000 mile trips. I just got back from a Florida to California and return 3 week camping trip - my choice was the RT. Picture is in Texas, Big Bend area, river road between Presidio and Terlingua.

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    Last edited: Feb 3, 2018
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  10. TPadden

    TPadden Member

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    Thought I'd add; my love of the RS is also due to my "last year oil head 04 RS". It's a timeless machine, one I'll never get rid of - still good looking and fun to ride.
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  11. Hut van

    Hut van New Member

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    Hi, where in the uk are you moving to and are you going to tour two up or single rider ?
    If you intend to tour the north of the U.K. It could be a lot colder than you are used to in Texas !
    So maybe a protective fairing would be a good idea.
     
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  12. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Agree with Andy of Mayberry. ...To keep it in perspective, the area of Texas is greater than Belgium and France combined. If you're comfortable riding around Texas, you should be comfortable riding around the Isles and Europe.

    Sounds like you're not riding 2-up, so luggage and passenger room are probably not an issue.

    I've ridden both, though I've never been touring on the RT. If I ever get back to the Alps or Scotland, I won't want the telelever suspension and extra weight and bulk of the RT..., but then, I'm a little old-fashioned that way.
     
  13. TPadden

    TPadden Member

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    Again, I've done both and couldn't disagree more. :D. I have a sister that lives in Scotland and I've lived in both London (3 years) and Austin (2 years).

    To keep it in perspective Texas weather is more like Spain (Texas latitude is comparable to North Africa) and the rest of the isles and Europe weather are more like Washington state or Oregon.

    For me, it's more about comfort in weather rather than riding distances. :)

    I should caveat my opinion with the statement that as I've aged everything gets trumped by my comfort. If the weather is taken out of the equation lighter is always better.

    Tom
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    Last edited: Feb 3, 2018
  14. AZGeek

    AZGeek Active Member

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    I’ve done some short tours on both. RT affords better weather protection and a bit better comfort in colder weather. In warm/hot weather, the full fairing on RT is no fun. In those conditions the RS provides better airflow making the ride a bit more enjoyable. I haven’t had the opportunity to ride in Europe but I would guess that any city riding is going to be better handled on the RS. The RT can be a beast at slow speeds.
     
  15. Bravo

    Bravo Plenty in the tank. Contributor

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    I really couldn't care less.
     
  16. TPadden

    TPadden Member

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    Aren't you a ray of sunshine in the winter!
    Tom

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  17. Bravo

    Bravo Plenty in the tank. Contributor

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    I never noticed you taking the picture.
    I've also posted my last comment on the wrong thread (blame alcohol) but I'll keep it on.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2018
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  18. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    R1150RS's or R1150RT's ..........£2.5k for a good low mileage one........less than the depreciation on a 1200RS/RT and sell for the same when you leave. Should get 90% of the capability of the current stuff at a fraction of the cost d no worries about leaving them in a shedfor half the year.

    However, if money no object, buy the RT if you want weather protection or the RS for a bit more of a sporty ride....or a GS to do it all. You won't go wrong with any.
     
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  19. Brimstone Mahone

    Brimstone Mahone Well-Known Member

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    Good info guys, thanks. I never ride with a pillion - other than an emergency if someone else's bike breaks down and they need a ride. And a pair of panniers the size of the BMW-brand panniers for the RS and my tank bag will easily carry everything I need. Initially I thought the F800GT would be a good choice, a friend toured Spain for a couple of weeks last year on one and thought it was a great bike. But I'm worried I would find it a bit underpowered compared to what I've been used to for many years. OTOH, I ride my old Norton Commando and although it is, of course, incredibly underpowered by todays standards, it doesn't make me feel that way....psychological hokum of some sort going on, I suppose. ;) I KNOW that the F800 GT has plenty of power in an objective sense - it has more than my wife's BMW F650GS had, and that bike seemed "peppy" enough though I never would personally have wanted one. TBH, the 800GT seems most sensible and practical, I'm just not sure I could ever "warm up" to it and I don't want to end up buying a bike and selling it a few months later because I don't like it that well.

    The reason I didn't really think about another RS is primarily price. I (we) don't want to pay the price of new motos and RTs are available in the UK from years back with 25-30k miles that are not expensive at all. The RS has only been made for a few years so they cost more than I prefer to spend. The F800GT is, of course, much less expensive. I will admit that my basic tenant is "lighter is better" and heck, for that matter, the RS is heavier than I'd prefer. So I DON"T like the added weight of the RT. But nowadays a 500+ pound machine is basically normal; my wife's Africa Twin weighs 536 pounds (curb weight); Her Diavel is 525. The Norton, which was a BIG bike back in the day, weighs a tick over 400 pounds. ;)

    The bikes (and us, when we are in the UK) will be in Bath and we expect to do a lot of UK riding as well as occasionally crossing over to mainland Europe. My wife has relatives in Trieste. Although we have spent a good bit of time in Europe, we have never ridden motos there. In fact, the only place on that side of the Atlantic where we've ridden bikes is on the IOM.

    Oh, as someone asked, am I "so old" I want an RT? When my 25-year old niece (also a rider) heard I bought a BMW motorcycle she said, "Oh no, Uncle Mike, only old people buy those!" Very encouraging. ;) She was used to me on Ducati sport bikes and the Commando (which she pronounced as being "decidedly cool").

    Maybe I'll look a bit more at the RS. If it comes down to it, spending a couple more bucks initially is better than spending money on a bike that I end up selling/losing money on a few months later because I don't like it. OR.. I hadn't thought about the good point Gordon made, going back even further to the 1150's and spending a LOT less. I'm going to look into that as well. The only thing that concerns me about that is mileage. As I said earlier, I have no lengthy experience with BMWs so I don't have an idea for what would constitute "too many miles" to consider as a purchase. Any thought there would be greatly appreciated.
     
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  20. TPadden

    TPadden Member

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    I wouldn't hesitate to buy any modern model with less than 75K miles if it looked and rode right. If I liked the owner after meeting him/her I'd add another 50K miles or so. I had a F800ST for 3 years and put 60,000 miles on it. It performed great and did everything I asked. I also put 50,000 miles on a Triumph ST about the same time and it brought more smiles to my face, it has a stellar engine......... Sounds like you have to make up your mind, there are many bikes that would suit your needs. My overall favorite, do everything bike is currently the wet-head RT, but my MV Turismo Veloce and RS compete for for my title of most fun to ride.

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    Last edited: Feb 4, 2018

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