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Question to Dunlop re RoadSmart 3

Discussion in 'R1200RS Tyres/Tires' started by Spratz, Oct 9, 2017.

  1. Spratz

    Spratz Member

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    I asked Dunlop a question about the RoadSmart 3, and received a thoughtful and detailed response. I thought others might benefit.
    The email I sent:
    "Hi,
    Are the Dunlop RoadSmart 3 tires, sizes F: 120/70x17 R: 180/55x17 suitable for a 2016 BMW R1200RS? The “Tires for my bike” tool on your website displays only the RoadSmart 2 and SportMax Q3 for this bike. Is the RS3 is a suitable replacement for the RS2?
    Are the RoadSmart 3 tires in the sizes above able to handle the load of the R1200RS fully loaded with passenger and luggage? The GVWR for the bike is 992 lbs.
    Other tire manufacturers seem to offer both “standard” and “heavy weight” or “GT” options on their sport touring tires. Most specify “standard” for the front tire of the R1200RS, and “GT” for the rear. I’m curious why Dunlop does not need to do this?
    Thanks,"​
    Response from Dunlop:
    "Thank you for your interest in Dunlop Motorcycle Tires.
    Our RoadSmart 3 is a suitable fitment for your bike. The RoadSmart 3 is the [successor] of the RS2 and has the same load index for both front and rear tires. Our tool might just not be up to date.
    Each tire size is classified with a Speed/Load Index. The Speed index is determined by the tire manufacturer but the Load index is determined by the tire size.
    So for the Dunlop 120/70ZR17 the max load capacity is 520lbs @ 42psi and the 180/55ZR17 max load capacity is 805lbs@42psi. This is the same exact load carrying capacity as our competitors who mark their tires GT.
    In fact, between our competitors GT and non-GT tires, the load carrying capacity is also the same, so we don’t see any difference in actual load carrying capacity between their tires.
    The Dunlop is fully adequate for heavier bikes such as the BMW K1200GT and even the heavier K1600GT.
    All testing is done to DOT standards which is determined by the Speed/Load Index of the tire. In addition to this, the Dunlop is the only motorcycle tire designed specifically for US roads. So the benefit is that we actually use the roads you ride to develop the product so this makes it much easier for us to meet the true requirements of a sport tourer without compromising performance. We’re fairly confident that our competitors cannot say the same.
    Regards,"​

     
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  2. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for posting, really informative.
     
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  3. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    What's this supposed to mean? I wonder to which roads and road surfaces they refer.
    Have they apologized to our friends in other countries - "Sorry, no tires designed specifically for your roads."
    What a bunch of marketing gobbledygook.

    On the other hand, I think Darrell is on his 3rd or fourth set of the RS3s (and 7th set of tires), and seems to like the performance - or at least the rebates.

    (Remember, almost all new tires are a lot of fun. Go and enjoy.)
     
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  4. Spratz

    Spratz Member

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    Thanks for your thoughts Ray. My main question was regarding load capacity, so their response was exactly what I needed. As far as their comments on the tires being specifically designed for US roads, if I was to read between the lines I'd guess they're saying "Our tires are built for and tested on the diverse (often pretty bad) road conditions of the massive US road system, not for the relatively well-maintained roads of small European countries".
     
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  5. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Or, they're saying that they designed for 700 pound American motorcycles cruising straight roads across the midwest at 50 mph....
    But, you should be able to find plenty of praise for the RS3s through the twisty parts elsewhere on the forum. If you run a quick search, you'll find plenty of support for giving them a try.
     
  6. darrell

    darrell Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Your post of the information reply from Dunlop confirms what I was told. I just completed a 8500 mile data collection ride for Dunlop and submitted the information to their marketing group who passed on to the engineering group, I assume. I was told Dunlop designed these tires at the Buffalo, NY research center but all the RS III tires are manufactured in Japan. I understood the RS III has 3 different compounds depending if it is sold in Europe, US or other parts of the world. The set of tires I used for the data collection were purchased from a retail dealer in the US and not a set Dunlop sent to me specifically for the ride. I removed them at 8500 miles despite them having another 1500 miles remaining as I was leaving on a 4200 mile ride and did not want to change tires on the road. I have 5000 miles on this set and they will go the 10,000 as well.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2017
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  7. TexasJock

    TexasJock Member

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    I wrote in another post that I was trying out Dunlop RS3's on my bike as a replacement for the Michelin PR4s. Having now ridden a few hundred miles here is my findings:

    1. front feels much much better in terms of feel when you turn in to a corner. I felt the michy a bit vague for some reason.
    2. they grip like crazy right from cold. I took a trackday last week and first session warmed them up for a couple of laps. After lunch I forgot they were cooled down and went full commit on first lap. Felt perfect. seems they warm up real quick.
    3. On the track the rear did rip up a bit on the left shoulder. This was due to 10 out of 12 corners being left handers and that I did not mess too much with pressures. 30 PSI front and rear.
    4. On the road they are absolutely fantastic tires. Even had a chance to ride in the rain and no problems whatsoever. I had a big spin up with the michelins a while back in the rain which may have been me giving it too much throttle but was surprising.

    As it has been said many times before any of these modern tires are a good choice. A lot is personal preference which is fine. I personally think this dunlop is better but others may disagree.

    brian
     
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  8. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    My thoughts exactly, after reading that bit. :D
     
  9. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Real world testimonial from Darrell, and since he rides similarly to the way I do they should definitely last similarly on my bike. As a result they would be the next set of tires I try. Only thing is, my PR4s are not wearing out! (Not that I am looking to spend another $400 on tires!)
     
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  10. darrell

    darrell Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Today I was getting the information collected to post my thoughts on the bike at 50,000 miles and looked up the price I paid for the 2 sets of Dunlop Roadsmart III tires I have installed so far on the bike. Both sets of tires were $288.90 before tax and installation. If you are going to mount this brand try and find a Dunlop Pro dealer as they seem to have the ability to sell at a reduced cost. I'm guessing they get some sort of rebate from Dunlop. The last set of Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT I installed cost $385.90. This was from the same dealer. The Dunlop tires from my dealer were $5.00 cheaper per tire than the Motorcycle Superstore was listing them. Only difference is I had to pay the 6.875% sales tax on the ones from the dealer. Also Dunlop has some on line rebates from time to time and brings the cost down even more. I got a $100 rebate on the last set and $60 on the set before that.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2017
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  11. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Hard to spend the full $400 dollars unless you choose the heavily marketed German stuff.... Of course, to a certain extent, we've all fallen into that category if we are on this forum.

    Not near the businessman that Darrell is, I leave it up to my dealer's shop guys to do the right thing. Rarely go back to look, but reviewed the last set of Roadtec 01s from September - $442 - $72 "parts discount" = $369
    (+ $34 sales tax and Missouri tire fee = $403).

    Darell's savings on the RS3s over the Roadtec 01s, before tax and installation = $79.

    If we assume that other than perhaps being a nail-magnet (see above), the RS3s perform as well as any tire out there - then -
    my conclusion - follow Darrell's advice, save the money on tires, and take the wife out to dinner one extra time before the next trip.
     
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  12. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Agreed! Although the $400 I quoted was nominal (was actually a bit less for me) but it was for the Michelin Pilot PR4s bought online and installed at the dealer for $25 (I brought them the wheel).

    With that same approach but for the Dunlops I should be able to get a set for close to $300 installed and if they last as long and are as good as reported then that would have me sold.
     
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  13. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Of course, how smart are we, really.
    I know what my time is worth per hour, and I can only imagine what Wayne might command per hour in consultation....
    So, while we're playing with numbers, how much is our savings cancelled out by time talking about it on the forum.... Let's see, Grumpy Goat..., (3,250 posts) (0.5 min/post)(1h/60 min)($X/h)=........

    (I know, I know, and I'll be the first to admit - the access to community intellect, insight, and camaraderie is priceless.)

    (Write-on/ride-on)
     
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  14. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Now why was my first reaction to that post be to check the equation to make sure the units cancelled one another out ... :D :D

    Actually this is a very good point indeed, and I factor this in all the time. It only makes sense if working on the machine gives pleasure / relaxation, and the risk of screwing something up is low.
     
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  15. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    The allowed hourly rate is low as well.
    Even if you don't take into account an earnings rate, there is also a cost when your wife (or significant other) comments that you are acting like a teenager... and it ain't romance she is referring to either.
     
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