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Puncture repair

Discussion in 'R1200RS Tyres/Tires' started by Willy, Feb 11, 2017.

  1. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Until the manufacturers of these products issue a written guarantee to replace any TPMS sensors that have been damaged, their claim that it is harmless is worth nothing. Way better to carry tire plugger and to do a patch as soon as you can - that's my approach. Also, IMO, this product cannot beat a properly vulcanized patch from the inside, where the air pressure acts to increase the sealing of the patch to the tire. No reliance of little fibres of whatever ...
     
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  2. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

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    Agree with you GG, never would use a slime/lifetime sat inside the tyre just because you may miss a small puncture, nail, damage and then when it causes a full failure you could get immediate deflation, bad enough in a car, not something wanted on two wheels. Some tyre repairers refuse to plug a 'temp/slime' repair and can charge you to clean the wheel internals and again I am not sure I want my tpm unit cleaned in some unknown solvent. My last two convertible cars (Ford and Peugeot) had a supplied air compressor with repair canister and I think it was the Ford garage warned me the solvent normally means a non-repairable but 'get you home' type of use.
    I carry the nippynorman CO cannisters and plug kit in the hope I can get somewhere safe for a full repair.
     
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  3. m1bjr

    m1bjr Active Member

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    Why the paranoia about 'slime' type additives?
    Most are simply natural latex suspended in water, so harmless.
    I have 'Stans' tyre sealant in all my MTB and road cycles now and all are tubeless. Self healing but requires replenishing every 6m or so.
    Last week I pulled the valve on the spare car and dropped 60ml of Stans in to seal a puncture - tyre is well worn so not worth vulcanising.
    Works fine as it's essentially what you get in a can - less the air
     
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  4. JohnnyRocket

    JohnnyRocket Active Member

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    I used this slime in my wife;s car tyres..... it caused horrible wheel wobble at speed..and when I dropped them off to be balanced they couldn't.... because the liquid in the tyre kept going to the bottom on the machine as soon as it stopped to indicate the wheel weight position! ... in the end they gave up.... i had to have all the tyres off to have it washed out..... I keep one in the boot of her car for emergencies.... as its easier to pump it into the tyre on a motorway..and inflate with the compressor....when you actually have a flat... otherwise IMO do not use!! I have Dynaplug kit and air canisters and a Motopressor.... better long term solution...


    JR
     
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  5. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Some are good; some aren't.
    A lot easier to get acceptable results with a light, small volume bicycle tire and wheel with lower rotational forces than with a motorcycle tire.
    When I use Stan's, it's with the tire off.

    And then, there's the TPMS issue pointed out above.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2017
  6. m1bjr

    m1bjr Active Member

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    Liquid latex is water soluble. Its in suspension in water. No solvents are required to clean up a wheel/tyre.
    Stan's has the consistency of fat-free milk.
    The faster a wheel rotates, the better it distributes evenly around the inside of a tyre - centrifugal force.
    The only way you can get imbalance if its somehow congealed into a lump, which it might with age/high temps.
    Surely you would balance a wheel/tyre pair before adding a solution?
    So far modern MB, BMW and assorted VAG I have had with TPMS have all been just fine with it, speaking from experience.

    I don't use it as a preventative additive on cars, only on cycles. The reason being it has a finite life and heat degrades it.
    Pulling a bike tyre and removing the old sealant is pretty easy compared to a motor vehicle...
    The stuff sold in aerosols isn't just liquid latex though, there has to be other additives or it would seal itself whilst discharging the canister :)
     
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  7. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    One of us needs to stop saving shit we can no longer use :)
    Bulb Kit.jpg
     
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  8. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

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    I put the spare foot-peg rubber in the little tail-box of my R11RS when I traded it in. So, I can say I'm trying..........

    But, just remember..........Both of us have youth and good looks going for us.
     
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  9. DJBee

    DJBee Active Member

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    My car does not have a spare wheel! This I discovered late one night when one of the tyres was flat about 5 miles from home so I put some Tyre Weld in it, blew it up with the electric pump and it got me home. No problem thought I and the next day I brought the wheel in to my local repair shop to get a mushroom repair plug put in. To my surprise, they would not do it and said that there was silicon in the aerosol sealants that meant that a patch would not work properly however much they tried to clean the inside of the tyre. Their contention was that the various chemicals, especially the silicon, degraded the tyre surface so that vulcanising adhesive could not grip properly and that the repair would fail. I had to get a new tyre. Interestingly, the TPS in that wheel was producing spurious low pressure warnings for a while after this but has now cleared itself and is OK.

    They might have been pulling a fast one on me but I don't think so- I know them fairly well. I have always carried a can of this stuff on my bikes and have used it twice in the past to get me home. In those days, I always followed the advice that punctured m/c tyres were not safe to repair. These days, however, as long as it is viable to do so, I repair m/c tyres myself with internal mushroom plugs as a permanent fix. I have never had a problem with these and consider them to be perfectly good repairs if done carefully. Michelin used to advise that their m/c radials were OK for two repairs within the central part of the tread but I do not know whether this is true or not now. Assuming that the story about the aerosol puncture repair stuff is true, I would not use these ever again. I have always carried an externally inserted plugging kit as well and have used these successfully several times in the past to get home. I still have the remnants of one of the BMW kits that I too got with my K75! I now carry a Stop and Go kit but have yet to use it.

    Does anyone here have expert knowledge of the aerosol repair products and their effect on permanent repairs?
     
  10. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I do not have expert knowledge of aerosol emergency tire repair products, but I do not believe that the tire repair people were not selling you a bill of goods and were correct.

    The tire sealants are designed to get you home in an emergency situation where you might not have the necessary equipment (or inclination) to patch the tire yourself. That means that the chemical properties of the goop does not need to be tire-preserving, and its commercial advantage is in its compactness and ease of use vs the cost of a new car tire and the likelihood of the user to replace the tire. Could be that the cost of developing a goop that would be effective and would leave a carcass that is repairable would be too prohibitive, and the return on investment is not worth the effort.

    Based on that I believe that what the tire repair guys were saying is true and I, for one, refuse to use these products on any vehicle I own. Other users have no issue with sealants and are satisfied with them and that is fine also; the market research justifies the need through them.

    I use Stop N Go products for my bike.
     
  11. DJBee

    DJBee Active Member

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    Just to be clear, I would never have used the aerosol tyre sealants as anything other than an emergency 'get you home - slowly' product.

    For that matter, the only permanent repair to any road going tyre that I would use is an internally fitted mushroom, although I believe other people do use externally applied plugs as such. I am also of the opinion that puncture sealants like Slime and others, while they may seal a puncture, do not necessarily warn you that you have a puncture. Various scenarios present themselves here. The nail, screw or whatever may continue to damage the tyre as you proceed on your way, oblivious to the fact that it is there. The carcass might have been damaged in some way that you not be aware of, etc. I once had a rear tyre puncture made by a 9" nail that had gone through the side wall on one side and emerged on the other! I have absolutely no idea how that could happen but it did- perhaps when the bike was banked hard over?. The thought of that being sealed by a Slime type product and me carrying on in blissful ignorance, makes my blood run cold. I am fairly certain that after a while, the damage to both sidewalls of the tyre would have made the tyre disintegrate at speed.

    However inconvenient it sometimes is, I prefer to know that I have a puncture when one occurs.
     
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