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Puncture repair

Discussion in 'R1200RS Tyres/Tires' started by Willy, Feb 11, 2017.

  1. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Until the manufacturers of these products issue a written guarantee to replace any TPMS sensors that have been damaged, their claim that it is harmless is worth nothing. Way better to carry tire plugger and to do a patch as soon as you can - that's my approach. Also, IMO, this product cannot beat a properly vulcanized patch from the inside, where the air pressure acts to increase the sealing of the patch to the tire. No reliance of little fibres of whatever ...
     
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  2. Dave

    Dave Well-Known Member

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    Agree with you GG, never would use a slime/lifetime sat inside the tyre just because you may miss a small puncture, nail, damage and then when it causes a full failure you could get immediate deflation, bad enough in a car, not something wanted on two wheels. Some tyre repairers refuse to plug a 'temp/slime' repair and can charge you to clean the wheel internals and again I am not sure I want my tpm unit cleaned in some unknown solvent. My last two convertible cars (Ford and Peugeot) had a supplied air compressor with repair canister and I think it was the Ford garage warned me the solvent normally means a non-repairable but 'get you home' type of use.
    I carry the nippynorman CO cannisters and plug kit in the hope I can get somewhere safe for a full repair.
     
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  3. m1bjr

    m1bjr Member

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    Why the paranoia about 'slime' type additives?
    Most are simply natural latex suspended in water, so harmless.
    I have 'Stans' tyre sealant in all my MTB and road cycles now and all are tubeless. Self healing but requires replenishing every 6m or so.
    Last week I pulled the valve on the spare car and dropped 60ml of Stans in to seal a puncture - tyre is well worn so not worth vulcanising.
    Works fine as it's essentially what you get in a can - less the air
     
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  4. JohnnyRocket

    JohnnyRocket Member

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    I used this slime in my wife;s car tyres..... it caused horrible wheel wobble at speed..and when I dropped them off to be balanced they couldn't.... because the liquid in the tyre kept going to the bottom on the machine as soon as it stopped to indicate the wheel weight position! ... in the end they gave up.... i had to have all the tyres off to have it washed out..... I keep one in the boot of her car for emergencies.... as its easier to pump it into the tyre on a motorway..and inflate with the compressor....when you actually have a flat... otherwise IMO do not use!! I have Dynaplug kit and air canisters and a Motopressor.... better long term solution...


    JR
     
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  5. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Some are good; some aren't.
    A lot easier to get acceptable results with a light, small volume bicycle tire and wheel with lower rotational forces than with a motorcycle tire.
    When I use Stan's, it's with the tire off.

    And then, there's the TPMS issue pointed out above.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2017
  6. m1bjr

    m1bjr Member

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    Liquid latex is water soluble. Its in suspension in water. No solvents are required to clean up a wheel/tyre.
    Stan's has the consistency of fat-free milk.
    The faster a wheel rotates, the better it distributes evenly around the inside of a tyre - centrifugal force.
    The only way you can get imbalance if its somehow congealed into a lump, which it might with age/high temps.
    Surely you would balance a wheel/tyre pair before adding a solution?
    So far modern MB, BMW and assorted VAG I have had with TPMS have all been just fine with it, speaking from experience.

    I don't use it as a preventative additive on cars, only on cycles. The reason being it has a finite life and heat degrades it.
    Pulling a bike tyre and removing the old sealant is pretty easy compared to a motor vehicle...
    The stuff sold in aerosols isn't just liquid latex though, there has to be other additives or it would seal itself whilst discharging the canister :)
     
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