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Pinlock Transition lens insert (C3 Pro)

Discussion in 'Helmets, Leathers, Boots and Gloves' started by Charles, Dec 6, 2016.

  1. Charles

    Charles Active Member

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    I am just trying to find out if anyone has used the new Pinlock brand transition lens insert for a Schuberth C3 Pro. I want one and can not find a retailer in the United States that have them. Figure if I asked all you guys someone would have an answer. It is Pinlock part # PLD55.051-TMP Thanks everyone.
     
  2. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    Wow, this is getting complicated. Used to be that a Pinlock was just one product to stop your visor misting up. Now, it made my head spin looking at the options - 3 strength grades, 4 colour choices, photochromic too and then Maxvision . No wonder they now cost the same as a visor ! In fact a visor and pinlock can now cost more than a helmet !
     
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  3. Bill the Cat

    Bill the Cat Active Member

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    Huh, I couldn't find it either, it's not on the Schuberth site, and you can't order directly from Pinlock.com which is where a search on your part number takes you. Funky.
     
  4. Michael

    Michael Well-Known Member

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    I have a plain, clear Pinlock on my Shoei GT Air. The drop down smoked visor is all the shading I need on a sunny day.
     
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  5. Charles

    Charles Active Member

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    Where I am in the U.S. riding West in the afternoon is horrible.
     
  6. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Me too, typically, although the RPHA drop-down sunshade is not as dark as I would like. That is where the prescription sunglasses come in. My Pinlocks are clear.
     
  7. Romany

    Romany Member

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    Travelling west across the central Washington Plain last summer late in the afternoon even with the internal sunscreen on my Nolan down I could not see anything because of the setting sun. I pulled over for a coffee, waited for dark, and enjoyed the night ride. Well, until the construction zone where they'd cut the pavement off and left it grooved for ten miles.

    Sometimes the western sun can be a real.....
     
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  8. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Nice helmet. I remember I actually used the flip down inner visor late into a track day in Las Vegas.

    I also use a full-face photochromic transitions shield with a clear Pinlock on my Shoei. I didn't understand the purpose of the photochromic Pinlock transition insert, because it leaves too much room for sunlight to come in around it. My wrap-around sunglasses do a better job, if it comes to it.

    One of the things I don't like about the photochromic face shields and pinlocks - they wear out faster if we don't store them in complete darkness - in my case, removing the shield and storing it in the original foil packaging until the next long tour.

    And a reminder that it's a combination of technologies we need to use - not just cutting down light transmission. E.g., good anti-glare coatings let more light in - a good thing when there are lots of shadow.

    Any reason those of us who always seem to like to ride toward the sunrise or off into the sunset shouldn't be using helmets with a removable visor? I mean, we have to slow down riding into the sun anyway; it's not going to rip our head off.


    [​IMG]
    upload_2016-12-11_10-21-4.png
     
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  9. Jim Evans

    Jim Evans Well-Known Member

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    Piece of electrical tape across the top of the visor. I think I should go into business selling it...
     
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  10. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    No need for the opaque electrical tape. I just bought this on eBay - grey transparent tape 1" x 25' ... should last a while. :)
     
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  11. fred_jb

    fred_jb Member

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    I always thought that photochromic coatings are activated by UV light. I also thought that modern visors are certified to block UV or do so naturally due to the properties of polycarbonate, and that car windscreens also block UV, which is why a lot of suppliers says that photochromic glasses are not suitable for driving. The pinlock is inside the visor, so how does that work?

    Edit: OK - it is placed on the outside: http://pinlock.com/overlay
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2017
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  12. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    I have decided to resurrect this old thread. I bought an Arai Vector 2 helmet and fitted it with a Sena 10U Bluetooth headset. The Arai came with a pinlock visor and the internal pinlock shield.
    I thought I was losing my vision, frankly, because with this combination (coupled with my bifocals) I found it really difficult to look at the BMW instrument cluster "on the move". The problem is you have to look through the pinlock piece, and then down through a curved section of the main visor. The optics are very limited.
    This week I got a plain, non-pinlock visor and my problem of seeing my instrument cluster is now solved.
    I guess that the pinlock will be used in the winter here, where misting can be a problem, but otherwise, I will use the plain visor.
    After reading all of the posts on the inconvenience of winter with our UK, Canadian and US members, my small issue with distortion is really minor, I know.
     
  13. PeTe T

    PeTe T Active Member

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    Well, I'll support you anyway. My Arai also came with a tinted visor and clear pinlock insert. I ended up removing the clear pinlock insert because of the poor optics. In a situation where misting is an issue the optics would be good enough but in my local climate this would be rarely needed, if ever.

    On the other hand I bought this alternative set-up to take on long trips to cold, miserable, drizzling, sodden places where the gloom is interspersed with periods of brilliant blinding sunshine, followed by serious shite. Like Melbourne. Haven't used it yet so jury is out on whether it was a good idea.

    20171007_082737.jpg
    Clear visor, yellow pinlock insert, silver mirror pro shield.

    I have a feeling it's either going to be brilliant, or a disaster waiting to unfold, literally, with my head inside.

    I usually wear sunglasses especially in the heat because they protect the eyes from bugs when riding visor up. I find these Serengeti polarised shades very light weight, slip into the helmet easily and pretty good optics. (I also wear contact lenses.) However when testing an RS last week seemed to have difficulty reading one of the modes on the display when I was trying to fiddle with it. Maybe I turned it off. But I think somebody else mentioned polarised lenses can give problems reading the RS' dash.

    Sorry, Charles, for dragging your thread a tad off topic. I wasn't interested in the transition pinlock because it looked like it wasn't dark enough and was very expensive (AUD$100) addition to the visor and pro shield. For dull weather I wanted the yellow to add brightness and contrast, a mere $40 rip off.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2017
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  14. SauRoN

    SauRoN Well-Known Member

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    The problem with the GT Air built-in Visor (I have one too) is that it's one static tint and sometimes too dark for the purpose at hand but without it too bright again.

    I would imagine the transition option would have varying degrees and therefore is more useful.
     
  15. SauRoN

    SauRoN Well-Known Member

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    Actually someone sells those inserts already.

    I got some with a helmet or magazine or something somewhere along the line.
     
  16. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Yes it is. More useful and more convenient. I will do a video comparing mine against the regular dark visor. Maybe this weekend if not too hot and a PITA to work in my garage.
     
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  17. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I have a friend that recently bought a $150 photo-chromatic face shield for his Shoei RF-1200 helmet and he loves it. The shield changes from dark to clear rapidly and really works. But he sure is careful with his helmet now. He carries it around with him all of the time and is very careful not to drop it.

    It has been my experience that any similar material, such as photo-sensitive glasses, that is located behind a good face shield will not turn dark the way it would if placed directly in the sunlight and not behind a clear face shield.
     
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  18. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I am the same way. When you buy a $160 visor for a $500 helmet you tend to do that. I also clean the visor very gently as well.

    Visors are typically UV blocking so that is why glasses don't get dark in cars or in helmets behind visors.
     
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  19. Willy

    Willy Well-Known Member

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    Would a pinlock really improve Melbourne?
     
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  20. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I tour almost exclusively with this same set-up - which is usually closer to $170. Love the photochromatic option - makes life just a little simpler during a 16 h day/night. (Of course, that doesn't mean I don't find an excuse to pack both silver-mirrored and clear shields as back-ups or options, but there are simply days I don't want to be switching out shields, and the photochromatic shield fits the bill.)

    The anti-reflective feature is also nice. (I have the same feature on my Oakley riding glasses - which I have equipped to keep my vision at 20/9 with a 10% bifocal reading area for keeping track of all that interesting information on the panel.... Yes, not sure it's been mentioned much on the forum, but vision is one of those correctable areas of performance where time in rehab, the gym, and on practice on the bike don't make it better, but money and a good sport-oriented ophthalmologist or optometrist can.)

    I will note that the shield is a little thicker than usual, and occasionally hangs up on on side if I'm too rough or aggressive with opening or closing. At the price - not for everybody or every time.

    This photo is from Motorcyclist. http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/m...ening-transitions-photochromic-pinlock-shield
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Shoei CWR-1 Photochromatic Pinlock Faceshield for RF1200, RF SR and X-14 Helmets by Transitions
    Transitions Photochromic technology allows visors to automatically and seamlessly change from clear to dark in sunlight. The process works when photochromic dyes embedded into the lens or shield react to UV light, changing levels of darkness with the sun.

    When UV light is removed, a chemical reaction driven by ambient heat reconverts the activated photochromic molecules to their original, clear form and the lens fades.

    Features:
    • 100% UV protection
    • Fades to 50% transmission in two minutes
    • Anti-reflective coating
    • Pinlock ready
    • Manufactured by Transitions, the leading manufacturer of photochromatic lenses world-wide
    • Pinlock Lens Insert sold separately

    As regards the thread - I always carry a couple pinlocked anti-fog shields. They go in and out as the weather changes. I use them only when I have to. They tend to scratch easily, so I always seem to be replacing them. I have a new one that will probably go in semi-permanently in a few weeks for the winter.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2017
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