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Michelin Pilot Road 5

Discussion in 'R1200RS Tyres/Tires' started by Lee, Oct 29, 2017.

  1. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    True but lap times do speak to grip especially in wet conditions. Mileage data only truly comes from real word experience like Darrell's.
     
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  2. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Just pulled the trigger on the Dunlop Roadsmart IIIs ($288 at Revzilla with my $10 discount) although I was tempted to try the new Michelin Pilot Road 5s which would have cost $75 more. At least this way I can compare something different to my tried and true Michelins. Of course after they are fitted (and broken in) I will be doing a review.

    Full kudos to the PR4s I have on right now which are pretty close to the centre wear bars after 12k miles+. I still have full confidence in the dry but not so much in the wet, so time for a change.
     
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  3. Scorch

    Scorch Well-Known Member

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    Good man!
    I can pretty much guarantee that you'll love them.

    I was a die-hard fan of the Pilot Road range, but was a little disappointed in the longevity of the PR4s. They were pretty much toast at 8,500 miles (still better than going down to the canvas at 8,000 miles on the original Metzelers, though).

    My Roadsmart IIIs are being replaced with the same on Friday, and they'll have around 8,950 miles on them when the new ones go on.

    Enjoy!
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
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  4. Graham Lewis

    Graham Lewis Active Member Contributor

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    thanks for recommendation oddly like the OEM metzlers that are on it, but no idea of how long they will last, 8800 is a good number
     
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  5. Scorch

    Scorch Well-Known Member

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    I've never liked Metzelers, so perhaps I'm a bit unfairly biased, but honestly, they went from 'Not too bad, though they're near the wear markers and I'll need to think about replacing them soon', to 'OMG I can see canvas and it's falling apart and how am I going to get home!?!' within one day.
    I haven't had that with either the PR series or the current Roadsmart IIIs.
     
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  6. oscarguitar

    oscarguitar Well-Known Member

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    So that’s an extra 300 miles from the Dunlop’s before they too were toast. :D
     
  7. Scorch

    Scorch Well-Known Member

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    No, my PR4s got about 500 miles more than the Metzelers, and the Dunlops topped the PR4s by about 450 miles.

    The main difference is the Dunlops (and the PR4s) still look like tyres now they need replacing, and could go a few hundred more miles at a push. The Metzelers literally disintegrated in the space of a couple of hours.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
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  8. oscarguitar

    oscarguitar Well-Known Member

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    My tyres PR4s now have 7000 miles on them, and plenty of tread left, but the handling has gone off and the right side of the front has some scalloping which makes the RS’s ‘tip in’ inconsistent and edgy. Once the roads dry out, I could go out and ‘rag it’ back into shape, but after 5 sets of PR4s I would like to try something different.
    I’m looking forward to GGs review of the RS3s as I think we have fairly similar needs, apart from the fact that I ride in 0 degrees C and he rides in 85 degrees F!
    The PR4s do warm up very quickly and in the UK won’t that matters a lot, but I find the lack of feedback from the front end unnerving, (rear is very informative, but that could be my riding style) which detracts from the confidence needed to really commit to some bends.
    So PR5s or RS3s? The internal debate continues.
     
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  9. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    True - assuming they kept the track consistently flooded at all times. An 8 second difference could be a couple of key dry spots that occured during tire changes or a bunch of riders, clearing the preferred line. Aside from the blue sky, the provided picture does not provide much in the way of information about controlled conditions. Although an independent judge was involved, I note the testing took place at Ladoux, which I is the site of some of the Michelin test tracks. How long was the track? How many different riders? What was the order of tires? Were the riders blinded to the tires they were using? Did they test only on one track configuration? How important was braking or acceleration on that configuration? Were corner speeds any different, or was straight line performance the difference?
    I would think that if the testing was truly scientific and well controlled, Michelin would have the video posted by now....

    *Based on internal wet lap times comparing MICHELIN® Road 5 tires with METZELER® Roadtec 01 tires, DUNLOP® ROADSMART III tires, CONTINENTAL® ContiRoadAttack 3 tires, PIRELLI® Angel GT tires, BRIDGESTONE® T30 EVO tires, and MICHELIN® Pilot® Road 4 tires in dimensions 120/70 ZR17 (front) and 180/55/ZR17 (rear) on a 2013 Suzuki® Bandit 1250, conducted in Ladoux, France. Actual results may vary." - http://www.motorcycle.com/features/michelin-road-5-announced-available-january-1-2018.html
    Ladoux
    [​IMG]
    The proving ground at Ladoux is located at the Michelin Technology Centre, 10 km north of the Michelin head offices in Clermont-Ferrand (in the centre of France)

    The site covers 450 ha.

    20 test tracks, 45 km long in total, for grip tests on wet or dry surfaces, handling tests, noise tests, comfort, etc.
    Logistics: Recharge bay for electric vehicles, wash station, unloading ramp for vehicles, secure buildings

    Agreed. Off the track, I take every turn in the rain with 2 assumptions:
    1. My assumption going into every turn that the exit will be blocked by a white Toyota pick up truck with a refrigerator that has fallen off the back - blocking both lanes (the old "refrigerator rule"). (And yes, this has happened to me - without incident.)
    2. The rain-specific assumption that there will be a puddle-covered blob of oil or transmission fluid at the apex.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
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  10. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    Does it have to be a Toyota ?
     
  11. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Well the color might differ.
    I'm pretty sure, that was the way the rule was originally presented in the now-defunct Sport Rider under the editorial leadership of Nick Ienatsch. (I couldn't confirm that on a quick search.) Given his reading prowess, @Richard230 probably still remembers or has the article.

    I believe you will also find it in the American literature as the "discarded refrigerator rule," no truck needed - though this sounds less challenging.

    I was actually thinking about that rule when coming around a blind turn in 1991 on my K100RS on the Great River Road in SE Minnesota when I came upon not a white, but yellow Toyota pick-up in the left lane, and a couple of guys trying to get a white refrigerator out of my driving lane....
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  12. oscarguitar

    oscarguitar Well-Known Member

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    Shock horror. Tyre manufacturer finds their latest tyres to be better than anyone else’s.
    Who’d a thought it??
     
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  13. SauRoN

    SauRoN Well-Known Member

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    So are they out yet? Anyone have them on?

    Am I looking for trouble to swop a PR5 onto the front with a PR4 at the back still?
     
  14. Scorch

    Scorch Well-Known Member

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    Almost definitely not.
    My tyre guy reckons that lots of people run different tyres front and back, and he's never heard of anyone having a problem. He tells me that some club racers actually do it deliberately because they want different tyre profiles between the front and back.

    My wife needed her rear replaced on her S1000R way before her front, but I wanted her on a Roadsmart III like I had, rather than the more sports oriented tyres that the bike came with. The front was a Pirelli, I think, and there were no issues whatsover, until she eventually replaced the front with a matching Dunlop.

    And PR4s and PR5s will surely be similar enough that you won't even notice the difference.
     
  15. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    I replaced my worn out Metzler 08 front with the Dunlop RS3. The back, a puncture replaced Metzler 01, will be swapped for the RS3 in due course. No issues with the tyres.
     
  16. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I can buy them here in the US today.
     
  17. Stef

    Stef Active Member

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    http://motorrad.michelin.de/reifenfreigaben
    Link gives you accces to all combinations allowed by MICHELIN for a certain bike in Germany. Enter BMW, 1200 and R1200RS.
    If you drive straight on all of the time, even car tyres will do. If you drive on curvy roads you better respect the combination if you want to have maximum joy...
     
  18. Jim Evans

    Jim Evans Well-Known Member

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    From what I can make out from the tables, it looks like you can mix and match front and rear by one tyre model, e.g. PR4 with PR5, PR3 with PR4 and so on. Did anyone else read it that way? Any German speakers out there?
     
  19. Daboo

    Daboo Active Member

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    On my first motorcycle, I got a nail in the rear tire and had to replace it. I had OEM Bridgestones on the bike. I thought the dealership would replace it with the same tire. They didn't. They put a Pirelli on the rear. The bike did just fine.
    I know owners who put car tires on the rear and have ridden 75K on them with no problems. Others who put bias-ply tires on the rear with no problems. I'm not advocating either, but I think sometimes we over think this. :)

    Chris
     
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  20. Martien

    Martien Member

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    Indeed, the combinations listed have been tested and approved to be used in Germany. And they are very strict in Germany, so only tested and approved combinations are allowed on the road.
     
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