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How do you keep your hands warm and dry during the winter?

Discussion in 'Helmets, Leathers, Boots and Gloves' started by swedkg, Sep 22, 2017.

  1. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I think you know that these are the most dangerous 5 words on this forum.

    There's already a thread on winter gloves from last year about the same time - http://r1200rsforums.com/threads/winter-gloves.2848/.

    My old contribution follows:
    I used to use some bar mitts or the equivalent, but now I simply carry a couple pair of Rukka's from Finland, that I use below 40 deg F (with fingers) and below 30 deg F (the "lobsters")

    I always carry some chemical hand-warmers, but haven't used them. The gloves use Gore-Tex, but a second pair decreases the chances I'll be forced to ride with a wet pair.

    They have a "2-in-1" system, which I use to maximize dorsal wind protection and decrease space between my palms and the heated grips.
    I never appreciated the wipers until I was forced to ride a wet snow last April 2 in upstate NY....

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Of course, as a physiologist, I'll point out the big trick is to keep the core body temperature up. My heated vest is the real defense against cold hands.
     
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  2. Peter Burridge

    Peter Burridge Well-Known Member Contributor

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    +1
     
  3. Jim Evans

    Jim Evans Well-Known Member

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    Polypropylene glove liners ( with good gloves, of course). They are amazingly warm.
     
  4. swedkg

    swedkg Active Member

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    ^^ Well, I thought of that. Don't those make your hands sweat therefore feel colder?
     
  5. Yoda

    Yoda Active Member

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    Gerbing do a wireless controller option now.
     
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  6. daesimps

    daesimps Member

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    Useful to
    Useful to know. I've had mine about 5-6 years and back then my only option was to import the Warm n Safe from the US.

    I've just taken a look and it looks much more bulky than the one I have
     
  7. DJBee

    DJBee Active Member

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    Yoda- thanks for the tip. I will look it up. Plugging the wiring in, unplugging it for petrol stops and plugging it back in again is a (very small for the reward) PITA. If the wireless thing does the job, I will get one asap.
     
  8. daesimps

    daesimps Member

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    As I described above, there is a single wire to connect even if using the wireless controller.

    The single wire pokes out of the bottom of the jacket and plugs into the pigtail that's wired into the bike. Takes under 2 seconds when getting on and off

    The advantage of the wireless controller is that you put the controls where you want. Without the wireless the controls for adjusting heat level sits inline between the jacket and and pigtail that's wired to the bike.
     
  9. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    Anyone have any experience of hanguards that fit the RS using original bars in the original position?

    I had GS guards fitted on my 1150R and they fitted and worked at treat......especially in cold/wet conditions (in combination with the heated grips).
     
  10. DJBee

    DJBee Active Member

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    Thanks daesimps. I have now looked it up and understand the set up I think. While I would probably get this if I were to start again, it would not really be worth it for £100 for me with what I already have, namely the dual controller and have worked out a way of clipping this to the top of the tank. It works fine really although I can see that being able to velcro the wireless controller somewhere convenient could be an advantage. When I am using the Gerbing's gear, once I have set it up, I rarely alter the settings and can fairly easily do this manually on the wired controller.
     
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  11. Jim Evans

    Jim Evans Well-Known Member

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    It's the stuff they make cross-country skiing underwear from. Not a problem!
     
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  12. daesimps

    daesimps Member

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    Glad you have a working solution. I can't remember how much the Warm n Safe controller cost me as it was well over 5 years ago.

    I tweak the temperature quite a bit (it's a rotary control with no predetermined steps). It tends to go on a high setting at first (fast boil), then turned down later (rolling simmer). I find I need to turn it down a bit when moving slowly through towns, then up a little bit when going quicker)
     
  13. Daboo

    Daboo Active Member

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    I used to do with multiple layers of winter gloves and handlebar mitts. For the past several years (4-5?), I've commuted with Gerbing gloves and jacket liner. The only regret I have, is I didn't follow the advice of everyone telling me to go with electric heated gear earlier. Before I'm a block down the road, the heated gear has me feeling nice and cozy. And if you're commuting, you often have times when the traffic slows down (and you need less heat), or speeds up (and you need more heat). A controller lets you tweak the heat to be comfortable all the time.

    I had to replace the jacket liner last spring. I had a choice of going with a wireless controller, or the old wired controller. I went with the old wired controller. I couldn't see the advantage in practical terms of a wireless controller. If you take the jacket liner off with the jacket, you keep those connections to the controller connected. So you're only making one connection to the bike's power lead. It's not a big deal.

    And I liked the idea of keeping things simple...and reliable.

    Chris
     
  14. daesimps

    daesimps Member

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    The reason I went wireless is that I couldn't find a position of the inline controller that I liked. With the wireless controller I have the twisty knob controls on the clutch reservoir, which I find easier.

    In terms of reliability, the Warm n Safe hasn't skipped a beat. One thing that made me choose it was the failsafe; if the receiver can't talk to the wireless controller it will come on at 25% when you connect up to the bike. I thought it'd be handy if the controller fell off the clutch, the battery died or some other failure. Luckily non of those have happened so far.
     
  15. daesimps

    daesimps Member

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    One other tip - if you're new to using bike powered heated gear then use a curly lead to connect yourself to the bike. That way when you forget and walk away from the bike whilst still connected, which you will do at least once, the cable will stretch and not break anything.
     
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  16. Daboo

    Daboo Active Member

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    The coiled cable isn't a bad idea, but the standard connector the controller comes with, just pulls apart if you walk away from it. I think they are designed for that purpose.

    I used to hook my controller to my jacket. There was a place in the front that the controller case could hook onto and put the controller dials within easy reach. Another location I played around with last winter, was to hook the controller case onto a strap that was on the outside of my tank bag. It was close and I didn't have to reach to get to it.
     
  17. daesimps

    daesimps Member

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    They may have changed it since as mine is old, but that wasn't my experience. It pulled apart really easily by hand as you tend to keep the two connectors square as you pull. What I found was that if they are pulled at slight angles it wedged the connector on the inside tight against the one on the outside (male inside female) and made it not come apart so easily.
     
  18. Last

    Last Active Member

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    Anyone use the fairing mounted hand guards? I'm really tempted.
     

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  19. To and Fro

    To and Fro Active Member

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    Never used them but I think the tinted version might look good for winter riding.
     
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  20. Yoda

    Yoda Active Member

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    According to the video on the Gerbing website it looks as though the wireless controller will just function as a normal dual controller if the wireless part fails (or falls off the bike?).
     
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