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How do you keep your hands warm and dry during the winter?

Discussion in 'Helmets, Leathers, Boots and Gloves' started by swedkg, Sep 22, 2017.

  1. swedkg

    swedkg Active Member

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    I have a pair of Rev'it Summit 2 H2O. Not really thrilled with them, especially when temperatures drop below 8°C. On the opposite, they tend to become uncomfortable above 20°C. They seem relative good from keeping the rain from touching my hands though.

    The other day I was heading to Charleroi, BE. I left home early in the morning, the temperature was 7.5°C, I was hoping things would be better later on. It never happened, the temperature dropped to 2.5°C, the heated grips were not enough to keep my hands warm nor dry. Often, when I stop and remove my gloves, I find my hands to be wet, apart from being cold.

    I'm thinking of getting a pair of merino wool inner gloves, what do you guys think?
     
  2. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    Now, MotoLegends, a pretty cool shop here in the UK wrote an article on this in their magazine last year. Basically, if I recall correctly, they suggest that heating damp gloves produce a capillary effect where the heat causes the waterproof lining of gloves to fail and moisture to get through.
    Maybe someone will contradict me over the science - but Im pretty sure I'm right that they said your choice in the rain is dry and cold or wet and warm
     
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  3. swedkg

    swedkg Active Member

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    I'd agree with that. On cold days, I turn on the heated grips before it is too late, trying to keep the gloves dry. Sometimes I don't tighten them so much, trying to let some air (and humidity) escape out.
     
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  4. boxter

    boxter Active Member

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    RST gloves which are 100% waterproof and heated grips.

    If below 3 deg then nylon over mitts, nice and warm.

    Ged
     
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  5. Brian63

    Brian63 Active Member

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    Yes that works same issue with heated seats and a damp but
    As for keeping dry have a look at halvarsons not cheep but good quality
    You get what you pay for
    Brian
     
  6. steviegasgas

    steviegasgas Member

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  7. Bravo

    Bravo Plenty in the tank. Contributor

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    Leave the bike in the garage and take your car;)
     
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  8. swedkg

    swedkg Active Member

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    This is not an option. I park my bike in front of my car. If I'm to move my bike, I'd better ride it :)
     
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  9. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    Move to Australia, mate!
     
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  10. boxter

    boxter Active Member

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    I bought a set of these gloves, they were worse than the cheap ones I was using, at 5 reg my hands froze, so I sent them back to Halverson's.

    Ged
     
  11. daesimps

    daesimps Member

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    I have Gerbing heated gloves. They've been totally waterproof through some incredible rain. The advantage of heated gloves is they heat the whole hand, not just the palms, as it's the back of the hands that are exposed to the cold wind. They also tend to have less insulation, so when switched off they can be used in slightly warmer weather than full on winter gloves
     
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  12. mousejockey40

    mousejockey40 Active Member

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    Beat me too it again Bravo ;)
     
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  13. Bravo

    Bravo Plenty in the tank. Contributor

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    Ah you won't catch me with my trousers :)
     
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  14. roger coleman

    roger coleman Well-Known Member

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    fit handguards
     
  15. DJBee

    DJBee Active Member

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    daesimps has nailed it. After many years of having freezing hands and body, a few years ago, I bought a Gerbing's heated inner jacket and gloves. The joy of being warm on the bike is unbelievable. The heat is totally controllable with their controller and I have never been cold on a bike since. The only disadvantage is the few moments that it takes to plug it all in before you set off but absolutely worth the effort.
    I cannot recommend this highly enough if you ride all the year round. On the RS, you will need to set up a pigtail from the battery as the bike's Canbus thing won't tolerate the load. Again, an easy job and well worth it. Gerbing's even sell a made up pigtail to do the job.
     
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  16. daesimps

    daesimps Member

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    I have the jacket liner and gloves. Gloves plug into fly leads on the sleeves.

    I don't use the Gerbing controller. Instead I have a warm n safe wireless controller. The dual controls are battery powered and held onto the clutch reservoir with Velcro. The battery lasts about 2 years. There's then a receiver which sits in the jacket pocket. One wire hands out of the bottom of the jacket to connect to the bike when getting on. There are two outputs which connect inside the jacket pocket. One controls the jacket and the other the gloves. The jacket also had a heated collar, so no messing about with a buff.

    I liken heated jacket and gloves to having a warm hug all the time I'm on the bike. It really opens up the riding to all year round.

    One thing often overlooked when dealing with cold hands and feet is the core body temperature. The body naturally cuts circulation to extremities when cold, so cold hands could be a sign of a cold body. Getting heat near the kidneys is very effective as a huge amount of body passes by there very close to the skin. Getting heat there is like having central heating and can really help with cold hands.
     
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  17. swedkg

    swedkg Active Member

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    That's a lifetime goal :D

    Some amazing quality of information here! Thank you all!
     
  18. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    I ride all year - rode my Tracer to work in winter using Tucano Urbano bar muffs and the OE heated grips. These keep your hands warm and dry when it rains and stops a draught going up your sleeve.

    I rode the RS in -2C from my sister's at New Year. Used the OE heated grips and Richa Arctic gloves
    https://www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk/motorcycle_parts/content_prod/69186
    These were okay for the 80 mile journey. If I was going to ride further I would want the muffs on the RS, although, as my Tiger Explorer came with heated seats this is likely to be used for a longer trip in cold weather - the Tucano Urbano muffs I have are suited to the Tiger as they are massive, to fit bikes with hand guards.
     
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  19. Martien

    Martien Member

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    I opted for a little bit bigger and warmer gloves (Dane Fyn, with Gore-Tex liner), which gives a bit more room for warm air inside, and also for inner gloves. I bought a set of micro fleece inner gloves, but wool or silk would also be good I think. You can get these cheap at an outdoor sports shop like Decathlon. Haven't tested these inner gloves yet, so cannot tell you from experience how well it works.
     
  20. Jeroen1969

    Jeroen1969 Well-Known Member

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    Don't have a car.... But do leave the RS in the garage and take the R1200RT out (consider that to be my car actually).

    Do have heated gloves that warm the outside of the hands, the inside is warmed by the grip heaters. Batteries of the gloves work for two up and down work trips And the butt heat function of the RT is set at "Butt Frying Hot" position when I ride off, put it down to "Slow Cooking" once on the road. Heats the blood up and that warm blood goes in to my gloves as well. Very much doable until temperatures drop below -7 degrees Celsius. They rarely do in our country.
     
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