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Front Wheel Removal...

Discussion in 'Servicing & Maintenance' started by WilliamJ, Sep 9, 2016.

  1. WilliamJ

    WilliamJ Active Member

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    Ok, so I've managed to get my rear wheel fixed after a nail flat, had a front tire nail flat 2 days later. My guess is that both happened at the same time, but the front never lost pressure. Anyhow, after noticing the nail in the front, it was time to pull that wheel and take it to the dealership 70 miles away to get the tire replaced. No problem I thought, since I just went through this same drill on that back tire a couple of days earlier.
    Working in a 10x10 storage unit (93 degrees F today) shared with an HD Ultra and numerous other boxes, I didn't think this would be a problem since the rear tire was so easy.
    Had all the tools in my temp tool box since all my real tools are in storage, and proceeded to take on the job. Put the bike on the center stand, put a scissors jack with a block of wood to jack up the front of the engine case, and started freeing up the wheel. As per the manual,
    -Unscrewed the speed sensor on the left side and let it hang loose.
    -Used some blue painter's tape to cover the rim in the area behind the calipers in case I dinged the rims while removing calipers.
    -unbolted the calipers and used double-wire ties attached to the engine guards to pul them back out of the way
    -loosened the pinch bolts on both legs
    -then got pissed off because I needed a 15mm hex head and/or a 20mm to unscrew and pull the axle

    I'll stop here for a moment as this is when a very simple job became very annoying. I had to drive 4 hours total to get the "special tool" to remove the axle- Sears or Lowes just doesn't carry stuff like that. Why in the world should I have to purchase a "special tool" to remove a wheel on an expensive, allegedly high quality motorcycle? Tools to remove both wheels, do a basic oil change and basic adjustments should be mandatory on any MC sold- like a jack and a spare on a car. More on this later, but my simple wheel removal and tire replacement turned into a 2 day event instead of a long afternoon...

    To continue, once I procured the "special tool"- $19- the job took about 10 minutes.
    -Drove back to dealer- again, 4 hour round trip, and had tire replaced
    -Again, thanks MOA, as this tire seems to be covered by the tire replacement policy also- really good value as it seems I do live next door to a nail factory
    -reinstalled front wheel in about 10 minutes now that I had the additional "special tool"

    Surprise moment-
    After completing the install, I rolled the bike out of the storage unit and readied for a test ride. Had a complete panic moment as I squeezed the front brake and nothing happened- surprising since I hadn't disturbed the hand lever or opened the M/C during this process, so no need for a bleed I thought. A couple of quick pumps on the hand lever brought the pressure back, and all things returned to normal. Glad I now know so that I wouldn't go bombing down the highway after doing this next time.

    Anyhow, basic maintenance on this bike is incredibly straightforward and simple if you have the tools that you may not know that you need. The manual could be a little more detailed for this type of stuff, and they should state things such as " you need an Xmm wrench for this; Ymm for that" which I'm sure is somewhere, but not obvious to me.

    Also, a bit disappointed, as while down in that area of the bike I noticed a lot of green fluid had puked out of the cooler overflow hole, and my left fork leg was oily. Will engage in "watchful waiting" to see if this resolves with mileage or is a warranty issue. I suspect the latter.

    Somebody posted a thread about being "saved from buying a Harley". At this point, my 2016 R1200RS with ~2k miles has been more needy than my 2010 HD Ultraclassic which has made more than a few trips from the east coast to Sturgis without anything more than normal maintenance. The BMW is awesome to ride, but not counting the flats, is potentially starting to be a bit inconvenient to own.
     
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  2. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    The hole on the right side of the axle is 22mm. On the K1300S I used the back side of a spark plug socket.
    [​IMG]

    I had it cut down to make it easier to carry on trips.
    I've never changed a front tire on a trip, but you never know.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    You can purchase the axle tool and coil puller from Promach.
    The big side of the axle tool is 22mm.
    http://stores.promachdualtool.com/promach-dual-tool/
    [​IMG]


    I ordered a 12mm hex for the other side of the axle from Amazon for $6 shipped.
    https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B001HWCP1M/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    To the right you will see sold by Eio $5.99 with free shipping.
    [​IMG]

    After I ordered the tool from Amazon I discovered I had a 12mm hex socket in my tool box. It was purchased from Napa.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2016
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  3. Roger

    Roger Active Member

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    Nippy Norman does a Wunderlich one for £21 or a set of 3 specialist tools for (on offer at mo) £59 comprising F.wheel tool, coil puller and oil filter spanner driven by torx or spark plug spanner
     
  4. Boxerboy55

    Boxerboy55 Well-Known Member

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    I've got 2 short pieces of hex bar.
    Luckily acquired ahead of the wheel removal exercise :)
    I've learned the hard way at work and home that PPPPPP
     
  5. WilliamJ

    WilliamJ Active Member

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    Got all the stuff now... just venting a bit as its a simple wheel removal and I feel the tools should be available to the rider when buying the bike. Having owned 3 old Nortons, numerous HDs and other makes, the scavenger hunt to make or find special tools gets old, especially the first time you need them.
    Unfortunately, I'm living in a small apartment while my house is being built, and all my tools are in storage PODs someplace. I've got to keep the bikes in a 10x10 foot storage unit at least for a couple of more months...
     
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  6. WilliamJ

    WilliamJ Active Member

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    "After I ordered the tool from Amazon I discovered I had a 12mm hex socket in my tool box."

    I've done that more times than I care to admit over the years...
     
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  7. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    I realized that :) I posted my info to help others.
     
  8. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I agree with you, but then that would (a) cost more and (b) reduce the need for the "affluent" BMW owners to go to the dealership where they could well buy more BMW-branded stuff. ;) That is why fora such as these (and solutions like Lee's) are so valuable.
     
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  9. WilliamJ

    WilliamJ Active Member

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    This forum has already helped at least 3-4 times in the short time that I have owned the bike, and the solutions offered are all well received- hopefully I haven't inadvertently offended anyone with my semi rant. While buying the "special tool" at the dealership, I did order some sweet Clearwater lights...
     
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  10. darrell

    darrell Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I hope the dealer gave you the $19 tool after ordering the $600 set of lights on the same trip. Or at least bought coffee. I have the same challenge it appears you might have when I walk in these places. A $10 pair of socks results in a $400 pair of riding pants. My dealer has free bottled water and coffee so always feel I got something free out of the deal.
     
  11. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I once went to the dealership for touch up paint ($18) and ended up buying a car for 1000x that. ;)
     
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  12. darrell

    darrell Well-Known Member Contributor

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    See your as crazy I am. I went in last fall to buy a K1600GT and came out owning the R1200RS so I look at that trip as saving me money, but wasn't free.
     
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  13. saizou

    saizou Member

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    Just want to share my experience here too.

    Shaft drive is a godsend! Removed the exhaust and the rear wheel simply unbolted with 5 fasteners. Not like the fiddly chain system which could take your whole day if you don't have a sixth sense to tell when 5 other things are lined up.

    Front was a little more difficult but nothing new since it's similar to my sports bikes. Did anyone relube the axle? Grease was all over my hand as I took out the axle. And am I crazy? Was there only one spacer, which sat on the ABS side of the wheel?

    Also anxious to lift the bike up without front and rear stands but since the bottom of the engine is so flat, I simply jacked it.

    Other that, I probably would have not bothered taking the wheels off myself if I didn't have the correct tools. I was only missing the odd 12mm hex in the toolbox, quickly remedied at harbor freight. Worth investing in tools if you burn through a set of rubber in one season.
     

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  14. Daniel

    Daniel Active Member

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    Ha! I also went to harbor freight when they assured me they had what I needed, as you can see here the largest tool I had was not large enough, and, well, neither was Harbor Freights'...... I returned home and just like Lee did, discovered an old spark plug wrench that did the job.....interestingly enough, like others here on our forum I admit to initial frustration upon discovering I had (and still have) to purchase a special tool to service this bike myself. But my initial discovery and disappointment quickly evolved to feelings of satisfaction considering such a special bike would also require a special tool to work on it. Yeah I'm committed, I love this bike and now to budget for a few extra tools, yes that is a basket with weights to counter the front end up lol!
     

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  15. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

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    Lee,
    You get a Gold Star for that discovery. The ubiquitous discount store spark plug socket is the BMW special tool!
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2017
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  16. Boxerboy55

    Boxerboy55 Well-Known Member

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    Popped my wheel back on yesteraday
    Looking for a flat (light) 22mm spanner for travelling with my piece of hex bar.
    All too easy in the comfort of home.
    ps - the odd looking tape simply stops the hex bar falling into the axle tube.
    IMG_7474.JPG
     
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  17. Boxerboy55

    Boxerboy55 Well-Known Member

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    For travelling I wanted a slim 22mm for the RHS of the front axle. Couldn't find one in local bicycle shop so picked up a cheap crescent wrench - that became single ended. Job done.
    IMG_7522.JPG IMG_7523.JPG IMG_7524.JPG
     
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  18. avoman

    avoman New Member

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    And here is my travelling toolkit for removing either wheel, reduced to the minimum.
    a 13mm socket, 6 sided, 3/8th drive, for the brake callipers. A section of 12mm allen key for the front axle nut. This fits adequately in the 13mm socket. A cheap old spark plug socket, 3/8 drive that I cut down years ago for a K1200 front axle. See above, great minds think alike!
    T50, T45 and T40 torx drivers for the rear wheel bolts and removal of my end can, an Akropovic. A three inch extension bar for the rear wheel bolts. Finally a cut-down 3/8 drive breaker bar to connect to all the others.
    Please note that carving down an allen key or a spark plug socket is not easy. Use an angle grinder or a grindwheel.
    IMG_7322.jpg
     
  19. James Kennedy

    James Kennedy Active Member

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    The coolant puke seems to be pretty typical. Mine did the same thing around 2,000 miles. A little spit a few hundred more and that was it. 31,000 miles now and it hasn’t done it since. No issues yet. I just ride it and keep it serviced. Oh, and haven’t needed a valve shimming yet. Perhaps at my next service at 36,000 miles.
     
  20. Fjaoos

    Fjaoos Member

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    Is it absolutely necessary to remove the brake calipers or do you think the removal of the front wheel can be done with the calipers still attached?
     

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