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Favorite bikes from your favorite museum or show. All in one thread.

Discussion in 'Travel' started by ray2, Aug 13, 2017.

  1. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    We've seen photos from Barber and St. Francis Kansas and a few of the shows.
    Here's one of my favorites from the MOTO Museum in St. Louis (3441 Olive Blvd. Saint Louis, MO 63103) and the adjoining, motorcyle-themed, Triumph Grill. The museum space is available for catered events and is attached to the Ingacio Hotel (owned by my institution - Saint Louis University) and Eurosport - the local Ducati, Triumph, KTM, Vespa dealership. (Wait, $7000 for a new Vespa GT?) Admission is free - Mon-Fri 11:00-16:00.

    So, I liked this bike, because it makes a transverse twin look easy to work on - even down to the shaft drive.
    Not a BMW. Any guesses?
    upload_2017-8-12_20-16-43.png

    upload_2017-8-12_19-57-31.png

    [​IMG]

    Which of the Maserati brothers went for two wheels?

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    There are guys on the forum old enough to recognize this as the family transport while growing up (1932).
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  2. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    Is the 1st one a Horex? I don't think it is a Zundap because of the tubular frame.
     
  3. jlduck

    jlduck Well-Known Member

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    Oooh...I lived in St. Louis for 3 years in the late 70's. Gotta go back! One of my best friends designed the St. Louis Contemporary next door to the Pulitzer Museum, but the Moto Museum looks more up my alley!
     
  4. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

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  5. James Bagley

    James Bagley Well-Known Member

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    ...aka DKW or MZ.
     
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  6. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    1956 BK 350
    upload_2017-8-13_9-45-56.png

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
  7. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

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    After WW-II various US companies were allocated the technical rights to nazi-era german technology. As an example' Curtiss-Wright was received the wankel engine (NSU) technology but felt it wasn't viable for more than lawn mowers and waved the patent rights to larger engines. I wonder which US company got the DKW technology?
     
  8. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    On the money - Harley Davidson and BSA.

    From Wikipedia
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DKW:
    During the late 1920s and until WWII broke out, DKW was the world's largest motorcycle manufacturer [18] and the pioneer of front wheel drive automobiles with their DKW Front,[19]along with the Citroen Traction Avant. In 1931, Ing Zoller started building split-singles and this concept made DKW the dominant racing motorcycle in the Lightweight and Junior classes between the wars.[20] This included off road events like the International Six Days Trial where the marque scored some considerable inter-war year successes alongside Bavarian Motor Works At the same time, the company also had some success with super-charged racing motorcycles which because of their light weight were particularly successful in the ISDT[21]

    The motorcycle branch produced famous models such as the RT 125 pre- and post-World War II, and after the war with production at the original factory in GDR becoming MZ[1] it made 175, 250 and 350 models.
    As war reparations, the design drawings of the RT125 were given to Harley-Davidson in the US and BSA in the UK. The Harley-Davidson version was known loosely as the Hummer ( Hummer is really just a few specific years, but generally people call the Harley lightweights Hummers ), while BSA used them for the Bantam.

    IFA and later MZ models continued in production until the 1990s, when economics brought production of the two stroke to an end.
    Other manufacturers copied the DKW design, officially or otherwise. This can be seen in the similarity of many small two-stroke motorcycles from the 1950s, including from Yamaha, Voskhod, Maserati, and Polish WSK.

    Hummer - HD 1948-1966
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    Bantam - BSA 1948-1971
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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  10. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    I thought this was a Harley when I first saw it
    [​IMG]
     
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  11. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    My first car was a front-wheel drive 1958 DKW Junior. It had a three-cylinder two-stoke motor of 800cc and made about 28 hp on a good day. It also had a free-wheeling clutch that disconnected when you took your foot off of the gas, or when the road speed exceeded that of the drive train. Top speed was 70 mph down a steep hill - which was a bit too much for its 12 tires. They were sold by Studebaker dealers and cost something like $1800 new, but I bought mine slightly used for $400 and sold it two years later for $200 to a local fellow who wanted to drive it 4 miles to the train station which he took to work at his job in San Francisco. That was the last I ever saw of that faded "stove enamel" green piece of junk.
     

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  12. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

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    I didn't know the DKW connection. I thought the Hummer was a copy of the Bantam.

    In any case, an older neighborhood guy was a big-time Harley fan in the very early 1970's. He had an XLCR and one day made a garage sale find of a HD Hummer in rather pristine shape. I'm not sure what became of the bike, but I do recall the owner claiming that "white gas" was specified in the owners manual. That was the same stuff we knew as Coleman camp stove and catalytic heater fuel. In pre-REA days, our parents used it for washing machine and pump motors.

    His claim on the fuel could have been BS.......
     
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  13. Mr. 36654

    Mr. 36654 Well-Known Member

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    Moto Guzzi made small tractors in the distant past and Lamborghini is still a brand of large tractors in Europe (part of the Deutz-Fahr group)
     
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  14. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    French Motobécane - Biggest French motorcycle manufacturer before the second war.
    They still make motor scooters as Yamaha-owned MBK. They went bankrupt and were picked up by Yamaha around 1980. They reportedly made mowers right up to the end....
     

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