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Extended test ride

Discussion in 'Readers Rides' started by AZGeek, Nov 15, 2017.

  1. AZGeek

    AZGeek Member

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    My local dealer doesn’t have any RS for me to test ride, so I flew to Las Vegas and rented a 2017 from Euro Cycles. Spent today and will spend most of tomorrow running the bike around Lake Mead National Recreation Area and Valley of Fire State Park.

    So far pretty impressed with the bike. Wonderful torque and acceleration. First gear is not all that impressive because the rpm’s max out pretty quickly. But powering through 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th is a blast. Much better acceleration than my R9T, and my F800GT isn’t even in the same zip code (literally).

    The gear box / shifting is downright clunky compared to the smooth shifting of the R9T. Hopefully that is just this particular bike. The windscreen, as has been discussed to death, is pretty lame. When I raise it the wind noise/buffeting is horrendous, so I’ve been riding around with it in the lower position.

    No worries about this being too top heavy (my experience with an RT). Goes into curves really well. The suspension is wonderful in Road mode. Tomorrow will be running in Dynamic. They put new tires on the bike so I took it a little easy starting out this morning.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2017
  2. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    Great way to try out a bike.
     
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  3. Mr Turtle

    Mr Turtle New Member

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    I agree with you about the windscreen. I replaced it with a Puig tall touring screen. When mounted in the lower holes and in the upper position it is at a good height to look over it and there's very little buffeting. I can ride with my visor up at reasonable speeds and at 100km/h there's hardly any wind noise.
     
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  4. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Sport seat. Fast color (2017 - last of the Lupin Blues). Valley of Fire. I like your thinking.
    If you're maxing out first gear on RPMs, that would theoretically be at 55 mph.... If you're maxing first gear out "pretty quickly," then you're moving pretty quickly - of course many of us remember that at age 29, nothing moved quickly enough.

    When I'm pretending to be fast out of a tight corner, I usually hit the clutchless shift to second with a front wheel a little off the ground at around 40+ MPH and about 6500 RPM.

    Your observation reminded me of an old post addressing calculations of theoretical engine performance: http://r1200rsforums.com/threads/2016-bmw-r1200rs-gears-rpm-speed.80/
     
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  5. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    The dry clutch on the R9T has pluses and minuses over the wet clutch on the RS.
    On the plus side it disengages without drag, hot or cold. This means that the shifting is generally smoother - to a point. On the minus side the gear box internals on the R9T are rotating at a faster rpm than the RS. Because the RS has a "primary drive", where the little cog on the crank drives the big cog on the clutch basket, the engine will be turning faster than the gearbox. I don't know the ratio, but it would be around about 3 to 1 as a guess.
    That means the bits that fly around in the gear box at gear change time on the R9T are going faster.
    Servicing of the dry clutch is a big job; servicing of the wet clutch will be easier.
    Longevity of the dry clutch is probably less than the wet clutch, due to the effect of the oil and the larger "swept surface" all of which means the wet clutch should last better.
    The other difference is that the dry clutch rotates the same direction as the crank; which causes the twisting of opening the throttle, or closing the throttle on the R9T so much more noticeable. The RS, by being geared to the crank, has the clutch rotating in the opposite direction to the crank - cancelling out a lot of the torque reaction.
    Finally, the R9T has its gearbox filled with gear box specific oil. The RS shares engine oil between the gear box and the motor. I don't know enough to have an opinion on which oil is better - but my gut says gear box oil for a gear box is probably better.
    I know that when I abused the clutch on my R1100S, it would "squawk". So far I have not had a reason to abuse the clutch on the RS, mainly because it is so damned fast anyhow.
    So which is better? The air / oil cooled 1200 or the LC 1200? A. The LC.
     
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  6. runnerhiker

    runnerhiker Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I test rode an R9T recently and immediately noticed the engine twisting motion when using throttle, now I know why, thanks for the info.
    And I agree, the LC is better.
     
  7. Bill the Cat

    Bill the Cat Active Member

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    I've not ridden an R9T, but the gearbox on the RS and the shift assist takes about 2 days of rider-bike handshaking to smooth out. After that, there are no worries. When leaving the dealership on the RS and the first shift into first from a stop light, I got a big "CHONK" sound. Thought I broke the damn thing. All smooth after that initial panic.
     
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  8. PaulB_UK

    PaulB_UK Member

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    Now *that* is the way to test ride a bike! Hopefully those new tyres will be scrubbed in by now. Excellent photo too, btw :)

    Yes, the RS does seem to "run out of revs" sooner than expected in 1st, but that's no bad thing; all the grunt is lower down anyway. (I also put it down to getting to the red line quicker than you'd expect for a Boxer engine.) A few days riding it and you'll be shifting gear at the optimal rpm, and shifting along the road at a pace that would surprise many sports bike owners.

    Something to bear in mind, like any loan bike (or even dealer demonstrators) it will have been "pushed hard" to the point of abuse.
    If you're buying new, then you'll get to break yours in properly, and hopefully avoid any clunky strangeness down the line.

    Cheers

    Paul B.
     
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  9. AZGeek

    AZGeek Member

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    Pretty darn close to 55. I pushed it a little harder this morning than yesterday and tried to see what first would do. While I didn’t hold it there long, my general takeaway is that it was pretty buzzy up there. I am a little more satisfied with today’s results so far. Granted, I was pretty well satisfied yesterday. Did a stretch at 125 and was very comfortable. The acceleration on this thing is amazing.
     
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  10. AZGeek

    AZGeek Member

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    Thanks very much for the lesson. So far I am tending to agree which one is better. Hoping to be able to have both.
     
  11. ray2

    ray2 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    That's the approach I try to take. “Both: I will have them both!” declared this true-blue American
    (See The True Blue American by Delmore Schwartz)
     
  12. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    Boxers aren't really designed to be red-lined in every gear, including first. They respond better to finding the sweet spot and maintaining momentum and making progress with sophisticated grace. The R6 throttle to the stop technique will not result in enjoyable riding :)
     
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  13. Last

    Last Active Member

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    Says you. Full throttle is great fun.
     
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  14. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    :):)
     
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  15. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    I agree.
    On the inline engines I had in the past it was fun using the upper end of the RPM range.
    On the boxer, midrange makes me smile more than redline.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2017
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  16. GordonH

    GordonH Well-Known Member

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    ...the art of boxer riding is going fast slowly............ie covering ground quickly with apparently no or little effort.....they are very, very good at this (as are Duc's and Guzzi's).

    Jap 4's and Triumph triples are great for riding to the rev limiter cuts in.......but don't actually cover distance any quicker....a different kind of fun though!
     
  17. AZGeek

    AZGeek Member

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