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Brake pad question

Discussion in 'Servicing & Maintenance' started by Dejocko, Nov 16, 2017.

  1. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I didn't mean to imply that the rear pads were thinner than the front (I really don't know if that is true or not), only that the surface area of the rear pads are much less than the total surface friction area of the two front pads. Plus, the diameter of the rear disc is smaller than the front discs and therefore the speed of the disc past the rear pads is greater than that of the front pads, with their larger diameter. That higher speed probably results in greater wear, also.
     
  2. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    Actually the larger disc travels at higher speed. On one rotation, the larger circumference give you the higher speed.
    If you ride in heavy traffic, it is likely the rear brake is used to steady the bike. I found the rear pads on my FZR 600 wore to the metal in 7000 k. Fronts were fine.
    The reason for lighter wear on the front is the slightly larger pad and the greater number (4 v 2) of pads.
    On the track or in really hard use, the fronts will wear as fast or faster, but in calm street use, the rears wear faster.
     
  3. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    a factor of linked brakes - every squeeze of the front also uses the rear.

    On my TDM850 I used to wear the rear out faster than the front as I used the same technique as linked brakes to reduce fork dive into the corner - hit the rear pedal fractionally before the front to get the rear to squat slightly. The 2nd gen bike had brakes lifted from the excellent FZR600 so you would get a lot of fork dive if braking hard into a corner.
     
  4. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Hmmmm .... all this brake pad talk made me realise that I have not checked the pads in a long time and the bike has close to 23k miles on the original pads. Brakes fine and makes no noise. If / when I change the pads I will do a video.
     
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  5. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    You are right. I stand corrected about the radial speed of the rear brake disc. But I think we both agree about the affect of the larger total front pad surface rea compared with the much smaller rear pads.
     
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  6. boxter

    boxter Well-Known Member

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    It's been the same with my last 6 bikes, but I use the back brake to adjust speed just before i go into a bend, its a legacy from riding none linked bikes of old.

    Ged
     
  7. Stick Rockwell

    Stick Rockwell Active Member

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    I believe that I will remove the calipers on my first brake pad service and replace the OEM bleed valves with Stahlbus brake bleeder valves, https://www.stahlbus-us.com/, for possible line bleeding and future brake line flushes. I purchased and installed their oil drain valve kit before my break in service and that will simplify all future oil drain services for me. These items are of high quality, not inexpensive, but really help in the future self services necessary, and will save dealer labor costs quickly to justify their purchase. Don't forget that maintenance items and the labor to change them are not covered under the manufacturers 2-3 year warranty.

    Ride safely and err on the side of caution if you think the pads are near their life expectancy.
     
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