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Brake pad question

Discussion in 'Servicing & Maintenance' started by Dejocko, Nov 16, 2017.

  1. Dejocko

    Dejocko Member

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    Keeping in mind I know nothing.

    When I had some stuff put on the bike recently the BMW mechanic gave me a heads up that I had about 2-3 mm left on rear passenger and should change them in the next 1500 miles.

    I'm thinking about doing a 800 mile ride this weekend and having the rear pads replaced upon my return.

    Is this too risky and cutting it close or do you think based on the mechanics statement alone I should be ok?

    Thanks.
     
  2. MrVvrroomm

    MrVvrroomm Well-Known Member

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    How many miles on this bike?
     
  3. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    If you are going to change them yourself, why not take a set of pads with you? It will just a few minutes to swap them out if needed.
     
  4. boxter

    boxter Active Member

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    As there is a only about 1cm on new pads .2 or .3. Would be plenty for 800 miles, I'm heavy on rear brake and have done 6500 miles and pads are still healthy.

    Ged
     
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  5. Dejocko

    Dejocko Member

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    I would not be doing them myself and don't believe I indicated I would. However I don't wrench.
     
  6. Dejocko

    Dejocko Member

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    12,700

    The RS is my daily driver (half the time, as I have to move my six year old around and he's not quite ready for the pillion) and commuter and I tend to drag the rear brake in slow traffic from time to time. I also ride pretty aggressively as well and tend to do some intense braking on mountain runs.
     
  7. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    My recollection is that the recommended minimum pad thickness is 1mm. I would probably plan to change them a 15,000 miles, about what your service department suggested.
     
  8. Dejocko

    Dejocko Member

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    Thanks everyone for your help. I'm pretty sure the wife is vetoing my no notice solo weekend trip though :(.
     
  9. wessie

    wessie Well-Known Member

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    I'm not married but a friend overcomes your problem by being a hero and offering to get milk, bread or other item that has run out. He then disappears for the weekend.

    Remember, it is far easier to beg forgiveness than seek permission
     
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  10. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    I posted earlier about the brake pads, and I made an error on removing and replacing them.
    I used the prior technique of lifting off the calliper. On the RS you don't have to do this on the rear. You just remove the 2 "R" clips and tap out the pin. You then push in on the calliper (to get clearance) and wiggle out the pads. Really simple, really good.

    I have a set of new pads and they are less than 5 mm thick - more like 4.5 mm. My pads now have 2 mm.

    On my service, BMW noted that the pads were at 45% and the fronts were at 90%.

    So, my guess, 1 mm is the right time to swap them out.
     
  11. vat

    vat Active Member

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    Did you have to remove the rear wheel to get at the caliper to swap out the pads?
     
  12. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    Looking the front brakes it appears you can also remove the front pads without removing the calipers.
    Is this correct?
     
  13. MrVvrroomm

    MrVvrroomm Well-Known Member

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    You could wrestle the pads out without removing caliper, but, as you already know, you're going to have to press cylinders in to get new pads in.
    I think it would be less messing around to just remove the two caliper bolts.
     
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  14. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    No
    Rear wheel is undisturbed.
     
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  15. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    You can effectively press the pistons back into their seats on the rear brake as it is a sliding calliper. A knee to the outside and press does it.

    The front callipers are radial mounted with no side to side movement. You would have to pry the pads or piston back with poor access compared with removing the calliper from the disc / wheel assembly.
     
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  16. boxter

    boxter Active Member

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    Are not the caliper pins a one use life, not sure with BMW but some Honda pins are stretch type and can only be used once.

    Ged
     
  17. Brimstone Mahone

    Brimstone Mahone Well-Known Member

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    FWIW, seems odd that the rear pads would be worn more than front pads. I have never seen that happen in an awful lot of years of replacing pads (and shoes) on bikes and cars... Typically, rears need to be changed at ever other front change - sometimes at every third front pad change... ;)
     
  18. Richard230

    Richard230 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    That is because the front and rear brakes are linked. So every time you brake, the rear brake is used. Since it has much less pad material, it wears quicker than the front pads.
     
  19. Brimstone Mahone

    Brimstone Mahone Well-Known Member

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    Ah - less pad material on the rears + linked brakes. I didn't know the rear pads have less thickness of friction material on these bikes. Autos have the same thickness pads front/rear and they go through 2x fronts to one set of rears (as did all other bikes I've owned). But, as noted, none of the bikes had linked brakes anyway so even if they did have thinner rear pads - frankly I can't recall if they did or not - they didn't wear much anyway. I can recall several bikes that needed new fronts 3-4 times while I owned them and never needed rears.
     
  20. Lee

    Lee Well-Known Member

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    This has happened to us on all our BMWs with linked brakes.
     

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