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Another RS Down

Discussion in 'General R1200RS Discussions' started by terry847, Jul 27, 2016.

  1. Leon.P.

    Leon.P. Well-Known Member

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    Best Wishes for a speedy Recovery. Hope your back on the beast very soon.:):)
     
  2. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Thanks KenF and LeonP. In 3 days it will be 1 year since the impact. I guess the leg will never be just as it was before the accident but one year on it is pretty much at 100% functionality. Only appearance is different than before the accident. With some swelling at the site of the break (and that takes time to go away) and some puffy swelling at the ankle that comes as the day wears on and then goes away overnight. No pain anywhere.

    As for being back on the beast - I was back on it 4 months after the accident, in November 2016. :D
     
  3. Aussie Import

    Aussie Import Well-Known Member

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    GG, you're an inspiration.... especially considering you're a young bloke!
     
  4. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Thanks. :) Young is relative. :D Washed the RS and my wife's new Golf on Saturday and next day I was aching all over ...

    Here is a group ride video from yesterday. Sorry it is longish but I wanted to make it a memory for my friend and colleague visiting from Greece.
     
  5. Twistydevil

    Twistydevil New Member

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    Get well soon
     
  6. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Thanks TwistyDevil, but that was some time ago. Fully recovered (as much as I can from the leg injury anyway) now and have been riding ever since November of last year, more than one year ago. :)
     
  7. Twistydevil

    Twistydevil New Member

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    Sorry new to this and still finding my feet round the forum? am still recovering from a Large bang in Germany in July am hoping for some good news in January and able to go back to work
     
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  8. Andy Griffiths

    Andy Griffiths Well-Known Member

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    Twisty devil , the date of the post is shown at the bottom of the post
     
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  9. Peter Burridge

    Peter Burridge Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Fingers cro
    Fingers crossed for you matey
     
  10. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Ohhh ... good luck to you and get well soon. If everything goes well how long do you think before you can ride again?
     
  11. Okal

    Okal New Member

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    Hey Mr. G,
    Hope the physio is bearable. This is the story that reminds me that sometimes mindful riding is life preserving and sometimes it’s not.
    At Brands Hatch on 19 July 2009, during a Formula Two race, Surtees was hit on the head by a wheel from the car of Jack Clarke after Clarke spun into the wall exiting Westfield Bend. The wheel broke its tether and bounced back across the track into the following group of cars and collided with Surtees's helmet.[4][5]The mass of the wheel assembly hitting his head was 29 kilograms (64 lb), but given the speed of his car (approximately 162 km/h) at the time the wheel struck, the impact yielded approximately 60,000 joules of kinetic energy.[6]The car continued straight ahead into the barrier on the approach to Sheene Curve, also losing a wheel, and came to rest at the end of the curve with its remaining rear wheel still spinning. This indicated that Surtees had lost consciousness, with his foot still pressing the accelerator.
     
  12. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Agreed. In the overall scheme of things, many things in life can be seen as either life preserving / enhancing and some are not, and can even be life altering in some way. Motorcycling can do both.

    Physio was completed last year (November I believe) and was just bearable some of the time, especially when they used a metal stick to try and push the swelling up my calf towards my knee. That is not a pleasant feeling on a healthy calf to begin with, much less on a healthy calf.

    Now one year later, the swelling in the tibia is gone down almost to normal and the leg as a whole looks almost down to its pre-accident size. I don't expect there to me much more change, and don't really care as long as I have normal and full functionality which I do and have had for some time now. I have been lucky in that I don't even have weather-related aches from the repaired leg.

    As for John Surtees and the flying wheel ... amazing story, but sadly it happens more frequently that we realize. Since my accident I have become more sensitized to these sorts of accidents. As a matter of fact earlier this year a man driving his SUV was killed on the same tollway I use to get to work every day, by a loose bolt that flew off a truck. It does not have to be a wheel to kill ... just something harder than where it strikes, and with enough energy to cause the damage.

    Riding is risky business, and we can do a lot to minimize risk, but at the end of the day it is up to use and how much we are prepared to do to minimize that risk.

    Thanks for the post.
     
  13. TPadden

    TPadden Member

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    Guys I ride with sometimes ask why I always pass whenever I get behind anything; I reply I pass as soon as I can because I want to see everything in front of me as far as I can. Comfortably riding behind anything can get mighty uncomfortable in a heartbeat.

    Tom
     
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  14. Grumpy Goat

    Grumpy Goat Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Either that or I drop significantly back or change lanes. I trust no one on the road.
     
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  15. TPadden

    TPadden Member

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    I find dropping back counter productive .....:D

    The only time I'll follow at a distance is when using the other vehicle as a rabbit or deer guard.
     
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